Author

Zane Grey

Zane Grey
  • From the master of the Western comes a novel full of romance and adventure.

    Adam Laret—big, young, and headstrong—ran from Ehrenberg to the banks of the Rio Colorado. He was blindly fleeing his scheming, gambling brother and the woman Guerd stole from him. But Adam’s escape wasn’t complete until Guerd, in the company of a sheriff, hunted him down. Then Adam committed the ultimate crime. With the mark of Cain upon him—he traveled into the desert to atone for his sins.

    In a vast, harsh world of heat and beauty, of stealthy creatures and gnawing starvation, Adam faced death and madmen, Indians and strangers who lived where life was impossible. But nothing he did—no act of courage, righteousness, or violence—washed Adam clean. Until he met a woman and made a choice: to fight his way back to civilization, the most dangerous place of all.

  • Based on some of Zane Grey’s own real-life adventures exploring the rugged West with professional guides, including the Grand Canyon area, he here tells the story of hunters with their hounds that go to the rim of the Grand Canyon in hopes of capturing mountain lions alive. This is one of Zane Grey’s stories that is especially appealing to young listeners.

  • This is a story about an inquisitive little fish whose mother gave him orders to remain at home while she went away in search of food. But Finspot could not resist temptation. He had to take a look at the area surrounding his home in the coral.

    The result of his disobedience was more trouble than he had bargained for—and some very narrow escapes. He barely made it home.

  • Zane Grey wrote about the West and lived it as well. Tales of Lonely Trails is a collection of true travel tales describing his explorations of uninhabited areas of the West, much of it on pack horses with a guide.

    Here are descriptions of his hunting, camping, and exploring trips in the wild and desolate parts of the West, including Arizona territory, Colorado, Death Valley, the Tonto Basin, the Grand Canyon, and more. These adventures gave him the first-hard experience that he later used in writing his descriptions of the landscape and characters of his Western novels.

  • Zane Grey is at his best in this story of the building of the Boulder Dam, later renamed the Hoover Dam.

    Straddling the great Colorado River, a huge structure is slowly rising—a dam that will alter the course of this ravaging river and harness its awesome power. Men from all over America have flocked to the site, laboring at the dam by day and filling the nearby Las Vegas gambling houses by night.

    To Lynn Weston, a rich man’s son, working on the dam means independence and the chance to prove his courage. But an even greater challenge faces Lynn: he discovers a girl who has escaped her abductors in the back seat of his car and becomes her self-appointed protector. Suddenly, he finds himself threatened by a pack of ruthless gangsters with a vicious plan to blow up the dam.

  • An American writer travels with his fiancée to Tahiti and is lured away from her by the seductive splendor of the island and by a Tahitian beauty named Faaone, who sweeps him into a web of murder, deception, and revenge.

  • Trueman Rock is a daring young cowboy and rider. Six years ago he had to leave the cowtown of Wagontongue because of a history of gunfights and run-ins with bad hombres. Since then, he’s become a man who only uses his gun when he needs to, on rustlers and crooks. Now, he’s returning to his hometown. But things have changed. The town and its people aren’t what they used to be. He expects to find some of his enemies there to welcome him, but instead finds they’re all dead. In their place is the Preston family.

    The Prestons have just about taken over the town of Sunset Pass and reign supreme. But Trueman discovers that there’s a brooding mystery surrounding the Preston clan, centered on Ash, the eldest son. Ash is a cold, vicious, and slippery man. Unfortunately for Trueman, he finds himself falling in love with Thiry Preston, Ash’s sister. Ash holds a jealous love for her and she’ll do just about anything he says, and he’s ruined more than one love-struck cowboy before Trueman came along.

    Trueman Rock’s quest to win over the girl he’s fallen for brings him face-to-face with the sinister true face of the Preston clan and their control of Wagontongue, and he must confront them to be with Thiry and save the town he loves. Sunset Pass, first published in 1931, is another dramatic tale of the West by Zane Grey.

  • In the days of the frontier West, it was not unusual for desperadoes and fugitives from justice to seemingly disappear from the face of the earth. Shadow on the Trail by Zane Grey, one of the bestselling authors of all time, is the story of one such man who returned to reestablish himself in a law-abiding society.

    In Texas, young bank robber Wade Holden, once the toughest, fastest trigger man in the notorious Simm Bell gang, makes a promise to his dying mentor that he will go straight. He is tired of shooting, riding, and fighting. All he wants now is to settle down on the ranch for a nice peaceful life. But with the Rangers on his tail, he struggles to find sanctuary. With the help of a young woman and her family, he attempts to turn his life around in Arizona.

  • Four tales of love and adventure in the Old West introduce a cast of characters that includes a brave Texas ranger who risks his life against avenging outlaws to rescue the woman he secretly loves; a beautiful seductress comes between two brothers; a desperate fugitive seeks sanctuary with a peace-loving people; and a daring young schoolteacher journeys West to meet the man who has captured her heart.

    Included are “The Ranger,” “Canyon Walls,” “Avalanche,” and “From Missouri.”

  • Zane Grey’s bestselling novels have thrilled generations of readers with heart-and-guts characters, hard-shooting action, and high-plains panoramas.

    When his brother, Barse, pulled one of the biggest hold-ups Texas had ever seen, Bruce Lockheart took the blame for it, leaving Barse clear to marry the beautiful Trinity Spencer. Bruce takes to the fugitive trail for a crime he didn’t commit and is hotly pursued by a relentless ranger and the woman who loves him, fighting to clear his name. If she failed, he would have to hide for the rest of his life—or die!

  • A soldier returns home to find his parents displaced and their property stolen in this classic Western.

    “He leaned propped against the rail of the great ship, in an obscure place aft, shadowed by the life-boats. It was the second night out of Cherbourg and the first time for him to be on deck. The ridged and waved Atlantic, but for its turbulence, looked like the desert undulating away to the uneven horizon. The roar of the wind in the rigging bore faint resemblance to the wind in the cottonwoods at home—a sound that had haunted him for all the long years of his absence. There was the same mystery in the black hollows of the sea as from boyhood he had seen and feared in the gloomy gulches of the foothills.”

    So begins Zane Grey’s The Shepherd of Guadaloupe. After surviving the brutality of the First World War, Clifton Forrest returns home to find that his childhood home was stolen from his family. With his parents robbed of their property and the area under the firm control of his old acquaintance, Lundeen, Cliff must fight both his enemy and his ailing body to regain the right to a peaceful life on the land he once called home. The Shepherd of Guadaloupe tells of Cliff’s heroic journey as he battles Lundeen while juggling his love for his parents and the love of Lundeen’s daughter, Virginia.

  • Business ain’t easy when the locals stand to lose it all.

    “Molly conceived a resentment against the rich cattleman who could impose such restrictions and embitter the lives of poor people. And as for Traft’s tenderfoot nephew, who had come out of Missouri to run a hard outfit and build barbed-wire fences, Molly certainly hated him.”

    Although he doesn’t know cattle or cowboys, Missourian Jim Traft finds himself as the foreman of a tough Arizona outfit tasked with fencing a hundred miles of open cattle range. Brought on by his wealthy uncle, he faces this difficult trial with youthful aplomb.

    But Traft faces a community that stands to suffer because of this new drift fence, and he must walk a fine line in order to honor his uncle’s business while not incurring the wrath of longtime residents. The Drift Fence shows how this tender young man struggles to overcome the odds he faces and ultimately wins over the heart of the beautiful young lass, Molly Dunn.

  • When not writing his famous Western novels, Zane Grey was an insatiable angler. Tales of Southern Rivers recounts his tales of fishing in the Gulf of Mexico, the Florida Keys, the Everglades, and on remote rivers in the jungles of Mexico. With many of these venues being some of today’s most popular saltwater fly-fishing destinations, no one will want to miss these highly entertaining and informative stories. Armchair fishing will never be the same.

  • Panguitch is king of the wild mustangs. A magnificent stallion the color of a lion, except for his black mane and tail, he has been unsuccessfully sought for years by a number of horse hunters. Chane Weymer can hardly believe when the Paiute chief, Toddy Nokin, confides in him, a white man, that Panguitch and his herd are on Wild Horse Mesa in Utah. How can a herd of horses be on the insurmountable mesa?

    Chane buys horses from the Paiute that he plans to sell to the Mormons, but he is attacked by horse thieves and escapes with only the horse he is riding. Having evaded the thieves, he discovers the wild horses led by Panguitch. Now that he knows Panguitch’s access to Wild Horse Mesa, Chane decides to return to capture the wild stallion.

    Chane is near exhaustion when he rides into the Melberne-Loughbridge horse-hunting camp. Amazed to find that his brother is part of the crew there, he accepts Melberne’s invitation to join them. But trouble lies ahead as Benton Manerube, a man associated with the horse thieves who attacked Chane, is in the camp posing as an expert horse hunter.

  • From beloved author Zane Grey come four thrilling tales of the West. The very essence of the American West can be found in the stories of Zane Grey, an author whose popularity has not flagged since his first novel was published.

    "Silvermane" is concerned with the efforts of two Mormon mustangers, brothers Lee and Cuth Stewart, to capture a wild stallion in the Sevier range country.

    "Tappan's Burro," with the text restored from the author's handwritten manuscript, tells of the life of a desert prospector and his burro, Jenet. Tappan dreams of finding gold—and does. When he is pursued by claim jumpers, it is Jenet who guides him across the floor of Death Valley when it is beset by suffocating gales of nocturnal heat and gas.

    "Ca├▒on Walls," also restored according to the author's holographic manuscript, is the story of outlaw Smoke Bellew, who enters a remote Mormon settlement only a jump ahead of a posse. Finding employment as a ranch hand working for a dowager Mormon, Smoke is able to make her ranch a financial success while simultaneously falling in love with her wanton daughter, Rebecca. But it is too good to last.

    "From Missouri," its text restored as well, is a story about a schoolteacher from the East who is discouraged from coming to Arizona Territory by letters forged by three cowhands. But the mysterious Frank Owens' love letters convince her she must come anyway. When Jane Stacey does arrive, to the amazement of the three cowhands, she is not the middle-aged matron they had expected but a young and very attractive woman. However, the lecherous Beady Jones has his own idea of how the new schoolmarm should be introduced to the West.

  • Wildfire is a glorious beast, a fiery red stallion that is captured and broken by Lin Slone, a horse trainer. A legendary and miraculous horse, Wildfire is also a curse—a horse who could run like the wind but who could also injure those who love him most.

    Zane Grey is the master of the Western novel. His works have thrilled generations of readers with brave and noble characters, hard-shooting action, and high-plains panoramas. Truly he symbolizes the spirit of the Old West.

  • From the master of the western novel comes a tale full of romance and adventure. Carley Burch, a young orphaned woman, is living a life of leisure in her family's New York City home. When her fianc├®, Glenn Kilbourne, returns from France ill and broken after fighting in World War I, he heads west, drawn to the mountains and canyons of Arizona. Carley, after receiving a series of puzzling letters from her beloved, pays him a surprise visit. There, surrounded by the natural beauty of Arizona, their love will be tested.

    Listeners will breathlessly follow the story of their love with keen satisfaction from the very start to the dramatic close.

    The Call of the Canyonis another of Zane Grey's strong and gripping stories, which have made him one of the most popular authors in the world.

  • Texas. They took the most contrary bunch of frontiersmen, ranchers, farmers, cowpokes, shiftless no-accounts, shootists, rascals, and politicians, jumbled them together, and somehow formed a state. They called it Texas, but for defenseless women and children, it was hell.

    Texas Rangers. Although they were outnumbered a thousand to one, the Texas Rangers fought a holding action against the complete breakdown of law and order, often paying for peace with their lives. But one county held out against attack after attack, a place so mean that a saint would have turned bad.

    Into this valley of death rode Ranger Vaughn Steel, hungering for revenge, thirsting for justice, and determined to wipe out the rustlers of Pecos County.

  • Considered one of Zane Grey’s best novels, The Vanishing American was originally published in serialized form in the Ladies Home Journal in 1922. It reveals Grey’s empathy for the Native American and his deep concern for the future survival of that culture.

    It is the story of Nophaie, a young Navajo, who is picked up by a party of whites at the age of seven. White parents bring the child up as though he were their own, eventually sending him to a prestigious Eastern college where he distinguishes himself by his outstanding athletic skill. The Vanishing American is about Nophaie’s struggle to find a place in society. On a larger scale it is about all Native Americans and their future in America.

  • The Desert of Wheat is a thrilling and romantic tale of sabotage in the wheat fields of the Pacific Northwest during World War I.

    Young farmer Kurt Dorn is torn between going to France to fight the Germans or staying in America to be with the woman he loves and to protect his wheat crop against saboteurs who question his loyalties. He struggles to come to terms with his deepest beliefs and his place in the world.

    In this passionate tale, Zane Grey, one of America’s most popular and enduring authors, captures the anxieties of a young country threatened by a foreign war and poised on the brink of a century of change.

  • To the Last Man is Zane Grey's archetypal tale of a bitter feud between two unforgiving factions: the ranchers led by Jean Isbel and, on the other side, Lee Jorth and his band of cattle rustlers. In the grip of a relentless code of loyalty to their own people, they fight the war of the Tonto Basin, desperately, doggedly, to the last man, neither side seeing the futility of it until it is too late.

    In this volatile environment, young Jean finds himself hopelessly in love with a girl from whom he is apparently separated by an impassable barrier—the daughter of his father's enemy. How Jean battles to overcome his difficult situation makes for a dramatic conclusion to this desperate feud.

    Loosely based on actual historical events, this thrilling story of a hopeless romance amidst a sea of violence will keep listeners spellbound.

  • “Hezd rope the devil and tie him down...if the lasso didn’t burn,” it was said of “Buffalo Jones,” one of the last of the famous plainsmen who trod the trails of the Old West. Killing was repulsive to him and the passion of his life was to capture wild beasts alive. When he saw that the extinction of the buffalo was inevitable, he labored for ten years pursuing, capturing and taming the noble beasts, for which the West gave him fame and the name Preserver of the American Bison.

    In this thrilling story of a hunting trip with Jones, Zane Grey speaks firsthand of the great man’s courage and prowess; how he roped the ferocious cougar and took it, clawing and spitting, back to camp; how he nearly captured White King, the glorious leader of a herd of wild mustangs; and how the whole party made camp under the aurora borealis and hunted polar wolves.

    “I want to show the color and beauty of those painted cliffs and the long, brown-matted bluebell-dotted aisles in the grand forests; I want to give a suggestion of the tang of the dry, cool air; and particularly, I want to throw a little light upon the life and nature of that strange character and remarkable man, Buffalo Jones.”—Zane Grey

  • Set in the dangerous West Virginia frontier, this is the story of the heroic Betty Zane, the beautiful young sister of old Colonel Isaac Zane, one of the most courageous of the pioneers.

    Balanced against the grim incidents of the Indian War is the love story of Betty and Alfred Clarke, a handsome young soldier. Their romance, however, is plagued by troubles and endless interruptions before reaching its stirring climax. The exciting life around Fort Henry, an attack by Indians, Betty's heroic defense of the beleaguered garrison at Wheeling, the burning of the fort, and Betty's final race for life make up this remarkable story—a story filled with the life, color, and spirit of pioneer days.

    This novel, based on real people and events, is an evocative historical tale that will capture your heart and your mind.

  • Three desperate people who had fled Mormon persecution were being held prisoner in a lost canyon. Among them was a beautiful lady named Fay Larkin, whom John Shefford was in love with.

    The secret to the canyon lay in a hidden Mormon village of "sealed" wives, where the penalty for trespassing was death. And the treacherous half-breed Shad and his murderous crew were blocking the way to the village.

    The tenderfoot Shefford was desperate to rescue his lady. To accomplish this was no easy task, especially considering he didn't even pack a gun. He would have to fight his way to the canyon, knowing that his efforts might end in bloody slaughter.

  • She was named Columbine, for she had been found as a child, lost in the woods, asleep among the columbine flowers. And now that she had turned nineteen and had finished school in Denver, she had returned to her beloved Colorado range land, where she would have to face the problems—and the people—in her life.

    There was old Bill Bellounds, the man who had raised her. There was the wild boy Jack whom people expected her to marry. There was Wilson Moore, the cultured cowboy who she considered her friend. And then there was the mysterious rider who came no one knew from where—a gentle, middle aged man, but so terrible a gun fighter that they called him “Hell Bent” Wade—who would come to play the part of fate in all their lives.

    The Mysterious Rider is a romance and adventure story with the breath of the Western plains and mountains in its pages.

  • After the American Revolution, Jonathan Zane became a celebrated scout on the frontier. His adventurous spirit and love of the wild led him to Fort Henry, scene of countless Indian attacks. Farmers had been murdered, women abducted, cabins burned. Zane teamed with legendary scout Lewis Wetzel to mete out justice to Indians and outlaws, and settlers began to enjoy the lush Ohio Valley in peace.

    But one pioneer hoped to end Zane’s career as a tireless protector. Spirited and beguiling Betty Sheppard begged him to give up his lonely border-man existence. Duty commanded, however, that he resist all such charms. Zane could have only one sweetheart: the North Star. Then came the day that outlaws captured Betty.

  • The American frontier in the 1700s produced some men of utter ruthlessness, and Jim Girty was one of the worst. Living among the Delaware Indians in the Ohio Valley, Girty and his brothers incited acts of savagery and war against the white settlers.

    One of Jim Girty’s targets was the Village of Peace, a settlement of Christian Indians who had been converted by Moravian missionaries. Girty and his ruffians, playing on the fear and hostility of surrounding tribes, incited them to gather at the village, where they threw the ominous war club on the ground.

    Lewis Wetzel, a lonely, taciturn hunter whose family had been the victim of Delaware atrocities, swore revenge on Girty. The intrepid Wetzel, called “Deathwind” by the Delawares, had saved Fort Henry from Indian attack, but was he any match for the odious Girty?