Narrator

Carrington MacDuffie

Carrington MacDuffie
  • At the heart of Tamson House is the Wood. And in that Wood is the Mystery.

    Tamson House, in modern, urban Ottawa, is a rambling, eccentric curiosity of a house—and a place of hidden Power. Built at a point where the leylines meet, upon land that was once a sacred site, it is the gateway to a spirit world where Celtic and Native American magicks mingle and leak into our own.

    In the overgrown garden of Tamson House, a Coyote Man waits, green children walk, and music rises to greet the moon. From the garden, a vast and primal wood is just one spirit-step away … and in that wood is something that threatens the very existence of Tamson House, and all who dwell within.

    Charles de Lint returns to the spirit-world of his bestselling Moonheart in a splendid work of urban fantasy, bringing myth, music, and magic into our modern world.

  • Over thirteen months in 1976­–1977, four children were abducted in the Detroit suburbs, each of them held for days before their still-warm bodies were dumped in the snow near public roadsides. The Oakland County Child Murders spawned panic across southeast Michigan, triggering the most extensive manhunt in US history. Yet after less than two years, the task force created to find the killer was shut down without naming a suspect. The case “went cold” for more than thirty years, until a chance discovery by one victim’s family pointed to the son of a wealthy General Motors executive: Christopher Brian Busch, a convicted pedophile, was freed weeks before the fourth child disappeared.

    Veteran Detroit News reporter Marney Rich Keenan takes the listener inside the investigation of the still-unsolved murders—seen through the eyes of the lead detective in the case and the family who cracked it open—revealing evidence of a decades-long cover-up of malfeasance and obstruction that denied justice for the victims.

  • The first history—incisive, witty, fascinating—of the fight against sexual harassment, from the author of the New York Times bestseller Sisters in Law

    Linda Hirshman, acclaimed historian of social movements, delivers the sweeping story of the struggle leading up to #MeToo and beyond: from the first tales of workplace harassment percolating to the surface in the 1970s, to the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal—when liberal women largely forgave Clinton, giving men a free pass for two decades. Many liberals even resisted the movement to end rape on campus.

    And yet, legal, political, and cultural efforts, often spearheaded by women of color, were quietly paving the way for the takedown of abusers and harassers. Reckoning delivers the stirring tale of a movement catching fire as pioneering women in the media exposed the Harvey Weinsteins of the world, women flooded the political landscape, and the walls of male privilege finally began to crack. This is revelatory, essential social history.

  • Martin Luther King Jr. may be America’s most revered political figure, commemorated in statues, celebrations, and street names around the world. On the fiftieth anniversary of King’s assassination, the man and his activism are as close to public consciousness as ever. But despite his stature, the significance of King’s writings and political thought remains underappreciated.

    In To Shape a New World, Tommie Shelby and Brandon Terry write that the marginalization of King’s ideas reflects a romantic, consensus history that renders the civil rights movement inherently conservative―an effort not at radical reform but at “living up to” enduring ideals laid down by the nation’s founders. On this view, King marshaled lofty rhetoric to help redeem the ideas of universal (white) heroes, but produced little original thought. This failure to engage deeply and honestly with King’s writings allows him to be conscripted into political projects he would not endorse, including the pernicious form of “color blindness” that insists, amid glaring race-based injustice, that racism has been overcome.

    Cornel West, Danielle Allen, Martha Nussbaum, Robert Gooding-Williams, and other authors join Shelby and Terry in careful, critical engagement with King’s understudied writings on labor and welfare rights, voting rights, racism, civil disobedience, nonviolence, economic inequality, poverty, love, just-war theory, virtue ethics, political theology, imperialism, nationalism, reparations, and social justice. In King’s exciting and learned work, the authors find an array of compelling challenges to some of the most pressing political dilemmas of our present, and rethink the legacy of this towering figure.

  • We, the Jury has what most legal thrillers lack—total authenticity, which is spellbinding.” —James Patterson

    On the day before his twenty-first wedding anniversary, David Sullinger buried an ax in his wife’s skull. Now, eight jurors must retire to the deliberation room and decide whether David committed premeditated murder—or whether he was a battered spouse who killed his wife in self-defense.

    Told from the perspective of over a dozen participants in a murder trial, We, the Jury examines how public perception can mask the ghastliest nightmares. As the jurors stagger toward a verdict, they must sift through contradictory testimony from the Sullingers’ children, who disagree on which parent was Satan; sort out conflicting allegations of severe physical abuse, adultery, and incest; and overcome personal animosities and biases that threaten a fair and just verdict. Ultimately, the central figures in We, the Jury must navigate the blurred boundaries between bias and objectivity, fiction and truth.

  • When we think of slavery, most of us think of the American South. We think of back-breaking fieldwork on plantations. We don’t think of slavery in the North, nor do we think of the grueling labor of urban and domestic slaves. Rachel May’s rich new book explores the far reach of slavery, from New England to the Caribbean, the role it played in the growth of mercantile America, and the bonds between the agrarian south and the industrial north in the antebellum era―all through the discovery of a remarkable quilt.

    While studying objects in a textile collection, May opened a veritable treasure trove: a carefully folded, unfinished quilt made of 1830s-era fabrics, its backing containing fragile, aged papers with the dates 1798, 1808, and 1813, the words “shuger,” “rum,” “casks,” and “West Indies,” repeated over and over, along with “friendship,” “kindness,” “government,” and “incident.” The quilt top sent her on a journey to piece together the story of Minerva, Eliza, Jane, and Juba―the enslaved women behind the quilt―and their owner, Susan Crouch.

    May brilliantly stitches together the often-silenced legacy of slavery by revealing the lives of these urban enslaved women and their world. Beautifully written and richly imagined, An American Quilt is a luminous historical examination and an appreciation of a craft that provides such a tactile connection to the past.

  • This is an up-close look at the lives and work of the brave men, women, and dogs who serve and protect citizens in America and around the world.

    An acclaimed poet, Rachel Rose never expected to spend her nights careening along the roads in high-speed chases or searching the woods for armed suspects. Yet once she decided to meet the people who devoted their lives to police K9 units, she found herself signing up for the ride-alongs, training runs, and other challenges faced by these courageous people—and canines—on a daily basis.

    In this book, Rose introduces readers to police dogs and their handlers in the United States, Canada, Britain, and France, where their group’s official name translates as “the dog lover unit.” She is there to catch a criminal with Constable Matt Noel and Blackie, to patrol with Sheriff Gene Davis and Gunner, and to witness the tragic funeral of Constable Dave Ross, where K9 Danny follows the coffin, looking for his master.

    With insight, humor, and awe, this book reveals the feats that these human and canine teams accomplish and the emotional and physical risks that they take for one another and for us.

  • Every town has at least one beloved, if misunderstood, eccentric, and Beanie Bradsher belongs to Mayhew Junction. Some, LouWanda Crump, for example, would call Beanie a spectacle, but Beanie just marches—and dresses—to the beat of a different drum.

    Not much has changed over the years in this town. On any given morning, you’ll find the same people at the same table at the same café, and none of them have changed one iota in the past twenty years. But now Beanie Bradsher has won the lottery, and might be dating Sweet Lee Atwater’s husband. And the hometown basketball star Vesuvius Jones just got a face full of Red Velvet cake at the Trunk-or-Treat.

    The gossip has never been juicier, which might just be a good thing. Lord knows this town could use a good shaking up.

  • Chaos has descended on the Valducci family. Gina Valducci’s grandmother, mentor, and founder of the family’s thriving nursery business, has died. Her death sets off a string of seemingly unrelated events, including two horrific murders. Gina’s colleague Jeff stands out as an obvious suspect, with plenty of motivation, opportunity, and means.

    In her most unusual and complex case yet, Barbara Holloway accepts Jeff as her reluctant client. But to defend him, she must first discover how a secret will, corporate greed, stolen art of the World War II era, family skeletons, attempted murder, and an old ornate mirror factor in to the case. Barbara must reassemble the puzzle pieces perfectly, before it’s too late.

  • The Los Angeles Times affectionately referred to Freddy Powers as the “Ol’ Blue Eyes of Country Music,” and wrote that if you were to “ask country superstars Willie Nelson, George Jones, or Merle Haggard (they’ll) … tell you that he’s one of country music’s best-kept secrets.”

    The Texas Country Music Hall of Fame inductee has been to the top of the charts as both a producer for Willie Nelson’s Grammy-winning LP Over the Rainbow, and as a songwriter for many of country music legend Merle Haggard’s number one hits.

    Now, for the first time, Freddy recounts the entertaining and emotional stories behind his decades-long roller coaster ride through the music business; his voyage to the top of the charts, and his inspiring battle against Parkinson’s disease. Helping Freddy tell his story are exclusive interviews from fellow country music legends Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, John Rich, Tanya Tucker, The Voice finalist and Powers’ protégé Mary Sarah, along with a host of other Nashville luminaries.

  • Retired police chief Katherine Sullivan moved away from Edina, Minnesota, to feed her artistic soul in New Mexico. But when she receives an urgent call, her serenity is shattered. Nathan Walker, her best friend and former colleague from her days on the police force, is missing and his crew of security experts hasn’t seen him in days. Now it’s up to Katherine to fly home and track him down.

    Meanwhile, Edina is reeling from the murder of a local woman, which looks more and more like it could have a connection to Nathan’s disappearance. And as Katherine digs deeper into the investigation, locating Nathan’s abandoned car and compiling a list of potential kidnappers, another body is found—and Katherine fears time is running out for her friend.

    Finding herself reluctantly pulled into a new case, Katherine must set aside her artistic pursuits and tear herself away from her darling grandchildren in order to save her best friend in Death in the Abstract, the compelling sequel to Emily Barnes’ The Fine Art of Murder.

  • Brand-new stories by: Nick Petrulakis, Kim Addonizio, Keenan Norris, Keri Miki-Lani Schroeder, Katie Gilmartin, Dorothy Lazard, Harry Louis Williams II, Carolyn Alexander, Phil Canalin, Judy Juanita, Jamie DeWolf, Nayomi Munaweera, Mahmud Rahman, Tom McElravey, Joe Loya, and Eddie Muller.

    In the wake of San Francisco Noir, Los Angeles Noir, and Orange County Noir—all popular volumes in the Akashic Noir Series—comes the latest California installment, Oakland Noir. Masterfully curated by Jerry Thompson and Eddie Muller, the “Czar of Noir,” this volume will shock, titillate, provoke, and entertain. The diverse cast of talented contributors will not disappoint.

    From the introduction:

    Jerry Thompson: “Discovering the wang-dang-doodle jams of the Pointer Sisters shifted my entire focus. Stunning black women were scatting and bebopping all the way into my soul. I think what we’ve put together in Oakland Noir is a volume where this city is a character in every story. He’s a slick brother strutting over a bacon-grease bass line and tambourine duet. She’s a white chick with a bucket of hot muffins heading to farmer and flea markets, to sell crafts and get hooked up with some fine kat with dreadlocks and a criminal record. And it’s in the faces of young fearless muthafuckers pounding keyboards and snapping fingers, lips, Snapchats, and Facebook timelines. It’s the core of not only Black Lives Matter but all lives matter. We are the children of fantasy and of the funk.”

    Eddie Muller: “These days, writers and readers aren’t denying the darker parts of our existence as much as they used to, especially in crime fiction. Some writers just do it for fun because it’s become the fashionable way to get published. You know, ‘gritty violence’ and all that bullshit. The genuine darkness in noir stories comes from two places—the cruelty of the world’s innate indifference and the cruelty that people foster within themselves. If you’re not seriously dealing with one, the other, or both, then you’re not really writing noir.”

  • A spirited portrait of the colorful, irrepressible, and iconoclastic American collector who fearlessly advanced the cause of modern art.

    One of twentieth-century America’s most influential patrons of the arts, Peggy Guggenheim (1898–1979) brought to wide public attention the work of such modern masters as Jackson Pollock and Man Ray. In her time, there was no stronger advocate for the groundbreaking and the avant-garde. Her midtown gallery was the acknowledged center of the postwar New York art scene, and her museum on the Grand Canal in Venice remains one of the world’s great collections of modern art. Yet as renowned as she was for the art and artists she so tirelessly championed, Guggenheim was equally famous for her unconventional personal life and for her ironic, playful desire to shock.

    Acclaimed bestselling author Francine Prose offers a singular reading of Guggenheim’s life that will enthrall enthusiasts of twentieth-century art, as well as anyone interested in American and European culture and the interrelationships between them. The lively and insightful narrative follows Guggenheim through virtually every aspect of her extraordinary life, from her unique collecting habits and paradigm-changing discoveries to her celebrity friendships, failed marriages, and scandalous affairs. Prose delivers a colorful portrait of a defiantly uncompromising woman who maintained a powerful upper hand in a male-dominated world. She also explores the ways in which Guggenheim’s image was filtered through the lens of insidious anti-Semitism.

  • In this charming and smart series debut retirement isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

    Former police chief Katherine Sullivan has been called brilliant, brave, compassionate, and quirky, but after decades of crime fighting, this resilient grandmother with an artist’s soul is discovering that retirement can be just as deadly as being on the job.

    When Katherine returned to her hometown, her only thought was to comfort her recently divorced daughter. That was before a young woman was found murdered on the estate of the town’s richest family. Now, in order to track down the killer, Katherine must uncover the generations of secrets that at least one person has already killed to protect.

  • What would it be like to return to your hometown after twenty-five years in prison for a crime you have maintained you did not commit? And why would you?

    Walter Desmond is back in Trafalgar, British Columbia, having been officially exonerated when new evidence showed corruption at worst, incompetence at best, by the Trafalgar City Police conducting the investigation. His pitbull attorney is seeking five million in damages from the provincial government. But Walt has not returned to Trafalgar to pursue money or revenge. He just wants to know the why of it.

    The family of the murdered girl, Sophia D’Angelo, is bitterly determined to see Walt returned to prison―or dead. But for Trafalgar’s police, including Sergeant John Winters and Constable Molly Smith, the reality is that if Walter didn’t kill Sophia, someone else did. So, case reopened, it lands on Winters’ desk. The records are moldering. One investigating officer is dead, the other is retired―and not talking.

    The police are instructed to treat Walt as if he’d never been arrested or convicted. Someone else apparently killed Sophia, someone still walking free. But too many minds remain closed. It’s good luck for Walt that a group of women in town for the dragon boat race are staying in the B&B where he’s booked, women with no local prejudices. But then a townswoman, then a boat woman, are attacked by a rapist, the media gets active, and tempers dangerously flare.

  • With nearly half of marriages ending in divorce, an increasing number of people deciding not to have kids, and more people than ever identifying as LGBT, modern life is clearly in the need of modern relationship advice. Sex from Scratch analyzes the facets of contemporary relationships through the struggles, opinions, and experiences of a diverse group of individuals living in nontraditional relationships. Rather than telling readers how to snag a partner and find "true love," it gleans real-life knowledge from people of all sexualities and genders—including individuals trying to make open relationships work to those who have opted against having children—distilling their hard-earned wisdom. Contributions from Andi Zeisler, Stu Rasmussen, Betty Dodson, and others make this love and dating guidebook an essential, fun, and insightful resource for anyone in any type of relationship.

  • From 1966 to 1980, Damon Knight created the Orbit series of anthologies, representing the finest writing in the science fiction genre. Nineteen of Kate Wilhelm's stories were included in this series of twenty-one volumes. Among these are "Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang," an exploration of infertility and cloning in the aftermath of global environmental collapse. It won the Locus, Jupiter, and Hugo awards for Best Novel in 1977. "The Planners" reaches into the moral conflicts of a primate researcher and won the Nebula Award for Best Short Story in 1968. Other stories include a road trip into a woman's psyche; primal fears through the eyes of a wise and empathetic alien; an encounter in a bus depot during a raging winter storm; and the first "interactive" reality TV show. Ms. Wilhelm's stories are prophetic yet as recognizable as a story in this morning's paper.

  • This fierce and beautiful story charts the histories of two women: Rae, young, unmarried, and far from home, awaits the birth of her first child. Lila, a fortune-teller with no interest in the future, lost her own daughter more than a quarter of a century earlier in New York. When these two women meet in Southern California, it's earthquake weather—the time when unexpected things happen. Immediately, their lives and fortunes become intertwined, as Rae tries to break away from the man she has been with since high school and Lila reaches into the past to search for the child she lost.

    This contemporary world is set against a series of Russian folktales told by an old woman who lives at the edge of Manhattan, in a place so well hidden it can only be found once in a lifetime.

  • With "incantatory prose" that "sweeps over the reader like a dream" (Philadelphia Inquirer), Hoffman follows her celebrated bestseller The Probable Future with an evocative work that traces the lives of the various occupants of an old Massachusetts house over a span of two hundred years.

    In a rare and gorgeous departure, beloved novelist Alice Hoffman weaves a web of tales, all set in Blackbird House. This small farm on the outer reaches of Cape Cod is a place that is as bewitching and alive as the characters we meet: Violet, a brilliant girl who is in love with books and with a man destined to betray her; Lysander Wynn, attacked by a halibut as big as a horse, certain that his life is ruined until a boarder wearing red boots arrives to change everything; Maya Cooper, who does not understand the true meaning of the love between her mother and father until it is nearly too late. From the time of the British occupation of Massachusetts to our own modern world, family after family's lives are inexorably changed, not only by the people they love but by the lives they lead inside Blackbird House.

    These interconnected narratives are as intelligent as they are haunting, as luminous as they are unusual. Inside Blackbird House more than a dozen men and women learn how love transforms us and how it is the one lasting element in our lives. The past both dissipates and remains contained inside the rooms of Blackbird House, where there are terrible secrets, inspired beauty, and, above all else, a spirit of coming home.

    From the writer that Time has said tells "truths powerful enough to break a reader's heart" comes a glorious travelogue through time and fate, through loss and love and survival. Welcome to Blackbird House.

  • They're an unlikely couple: Lucky Smith, passionate environmentalist and old-time hippie, and Paul Keller, chief constable of Trafalgar, British Columbia. Their weekend getaway to a Scottish-inspired castle in the Rocky Mountains is a chance to explore their fledgling late-in-life relationship and indulge themselves at the famous Banff Springs Hotel.

    Trouble interferes when Lucky, strong willed and sometimes too stubborn for her own good, stands up to two bullies in the local coffee shop. To his horror, Paul recognizes one of the young men as his estranged son, Matt.

    In the early hours of the following morning, a frantic Matt calls his father for help. Lucky and Paul arrive to find a body on the apartment floor, but Matt has gone.

    Matt Keller is an experienced wilderness adventurer. All signs indicate that he has escaped into the backcountry. To Sergeant Eddie Blechta of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, running is all the proof of guilt he needs. Paul Keller can do nothing but watch the investigation from a distance, terrified that Blechta is right.

    Lucky's daughter, Constable Molly Smith of the Trafalgar City Police, abandons her chaotic Thanksgiving kitchen to offer her mom support. She has no intention of meddling in the police investigation, but she is as good in the wilderness as Matt, and when his sad, shy girlfriend asks for her help, Molly finds herself not only interfering but putting herself on the wrong side of Edward Blechta.

  • In the bucolic mountain town of Trafalgar, British Columbia, a young woman is found dead of a heroin overdose, her baby lying at her side. While this should be an open-and-shut drug case, restraint marks on the victim suggest that the death might not have been completely accidental.As the investigation into the young woman's death—and life—grows, the case becomes increasingly personal for Probationary Constable Molly Smith and Sergeant John Winters. Only two things are known about the dead woman, that her first name is Ashley and that she has a three-month-old baby boy. Who was she? Was this just a drug deal gone wrong, or is there something more sinister at play? Smith's mother, Lucky, has taken in the orphaned baby. Does he hold the key to solving his mother's murder?

    Meanwhile, Winters' wife, Eliza, is considering accepting a modeling contract with the same resort development that seems to be ripping apart their close-knit community.Has the disagreement pushed a member of this quiet community to murder?

  • In the Shadow of the Glacier introduces a new traditional mystery series set in a bucolic mountain town in British Columbia and featuring young constable Molly Smith.

    Trouble is brewing in the small town of Trafalgar. Constable Molly Smith almost literally stumbles over a body, the victim of a murder. The deceased was a highly unpopular newcomer who had big plans for developing a luxury resort outside of town. However, those plans were in direct conflict with the wishes of a draft dodger from the Vietnam War who had bequeathed land and money to the town upon his death with one request: they were to be used in the construction of a garden honoring draft dodgers.

    Smith throws herself into solving the case, in part to build her career on the force and to win the approval of her parents. She is also hoping to impress her new supervisor, Sergeant John Winters, newly arrived from the city of Vancouver, who has brought along his own set of personal problems.

  • Third in the popular series about the Bottom Dollar Girls from Cayboo Creek, Dollar Daze finds their love in bloom. Though every rose must have its thorn, it’s up to the Bottom Dollar Girls to follow their hearts. Leading the way is Attalee, soda jerk at the Bottom Dollar Emporium, who’s so hot and heavy with her beau Dooley that the pair seems headed for the altar via Thrill Hill. But Elizabeth is pining for her newlywed days when she felt more like a wife than a mother, while widowed Mavis has been up nights nursing a case of loneliness. Traveling love’s rocky road keeps the Bottom Dollar Girls busy, and these best friends discover the joys and heartbreak of romance though laughter and tears.

  • It isn't every day a movie star steals your husband. When that day comes for Chiffon Butrell of Cayboo Creek, South Carolina, she looks to the Bottom Dollar Girls to help her out of one fine mess.

    With three kids to feed and Lonnie's paycheck from the NutraSweet plant being forwarded to a California address, Chiffon is coming up more than a dollar short. There's just one thing to be done—call on her estranged older sister, Chenille. As crisis reigns, Chenille is welcomed by the Bottom Dollar Girls for her cool head and quick thinking. And when Chenille runs into a little trouble of her own, she begins to see the future in friendship. A rollicking, hilarious novel about two sisters who are each one of a kind, A Dollar Short is a delicious page-turner worth every last cent.

  • The New York Times bestselling sensation that’s “Steel Magnolias set in Manhattan” (USA Today)

    Once a week, an eclectic group of women comes together at a New York City yarn shop to work on their latest projects—and share the stories of their lives…

    Walker & Daughter is Georgia Walker’s little yarn shop, tucked into a quiet storefront on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Its Friday night knitting club is improvised by some of Georgia’s regulars, who stroll into the shop looking for tips on knitting and end up finding much, much more. So now, once a week, they gather to work on their latest projects and to chat—and occasionally clash—over their stories of love, life, and everything in between.

    However, unexpected changes soon throw these women’s lives into disarray, and the shop’s comfortable world gets shaken up like a snow globe. When the unthinkable happens, they realize that what they’ve created is not just a knitting club—it’s a sisterhood.

  • Who knew that being a Good Samaritan would lead Barbara Holloway to face her biggest challenge ever: being named prime suspect in a high-profile kidnapping?

    Elizabeth Kurtz has taken her small son and fled her ex-husband and his mother after finding a file of explosive material incriminating the family. Although the wealthy family employs a detective agency to find her, she manages to elude them.

    Defense attorney Barbara Holloway has sought seclusion in a cabin on the Oregon coast when her solitude is interrupted by a small boy who enlists her help with his unconscious mother. Once revived, the woman and her child disappear. Elizabeth Kurtz is again eluding searchers, and Barbara is accused of aiding and abetting a kidnapper. When Elizabeth finally contacts Barbara for help, Barbara finds the woman dead.

    While Barbara defends Elizabeth's housemate against murder charges, she herself is accused of obstruction of justice. Her life is put at risk as she takes on the killer.

  • There was a time when March Monroe thought that she and her daughter, Olivia, would never really cut the cord. They’d just upgrade to a wireless connection. Now, Olivia is heading off to college, and March hasn’t even told her that she’s decided to continue her own higher education. So it’s hard to say who’s more shocked when they run into each other at a local radio station where, it turns out, they’re both student interns.

    Adding to the fireworks are a fourteen-year-old son who probably won’t be speaking to March for much longer, a slightly tired marriage, a midlife crush, and a quantum physics class that just might put March over the edge.

    This new novel from the author of Must Love Dogs is an effervescent story of family life that will strike a chord with women of all ages.

  • Welcome to the Bottom Dollar Emporium of Cayboo Creek, South Carolina, where everything from coconut mallow cookies to Clabber Girl Baking Powder costs only a dollar, and coffee and gossip are free. For Elizabeth, Mavis, and Attalee, the Bottom Dollar Girls, logging nine to five at the Bottom Dollar is not just work time, it’s family time. So when news gets out that the Super Saver Dollar Store chain plans to run the Bottom Dollar out of town, things go cattywampus. Manager Elizabeth heads up a crew of dedicated do-gooders bent on saving the Bottom Dollar from the fate of spare change. But when her unlikely new love interest, who also happens to be Cayboo Creek’s wealthiest bachelor, pitches woo, out come some startling revelations about her past that turn life more than a little interesting for all her friends and neighbors.

  • Enter the city of Hart's Hope in the realm of Burland, ruled by gods both powerful and indifferent, riddled with sorcery and revenge. The city was captured by a rebellious lord, Palicrovol, who overthrew the cruel king, Nasilee, hated by his people. And Palicrovol, too, was cruel, as befitted a king. He took the mantle of kinghood by forcing Asineth, now queen by her father's death, to marry him, raping her to consummate the marriage.

    But by letting her live after her humiliation, he proved he was not cruel enough to rule. She lived to bear a daughter, to return from exile, and to retake the throne of Hart's Hope. Then she, in turn, sent Palicrovol into exile to breed a son who would, in the name of the gods, take back the kingdom from its cruel queen.

  • Voluptuous, sensuous, alluring, and fun. Barely 40 DWF seeks special man to share starlit nights. Must love dogs.

    Life after divorce for Sarah Hurlihy consists of juggling her job as a preschool teacher and the demands of her interfering family. Then her bossy big sister decides to place a personal ad for her, and the unexpected becomes a daily event. Everybody wants Sarah to put the past behind her and take a bold step toward a fresh start. But when Sarah winds up with a lot of new men and rambunctious dogs in her life, along with plenty of awkward situations, unexpected emotions, and not-so-easy decisions, she wonders whether those mindless evenings sitting alone and watching The Brady Bunch were really so bad.