Narrator

Noah Waterman

Noah Waterman
  • Booker T. Washington fought his way out of slavery to become an educator, statesman, political shaper, and proponent of the “do it yourself” idea. In his autobiography, he describes his early life as a slave on a Virginia plantation, his steady rise during the Civil War, his struggle for education, his schooling at the Hampton Institute, and his years as founder and president of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, which was devoted to helping minorities learn useful, marketable skills. He gives an account of his travels, speeches, and meetings with various leaders, including Theodore Roosevelt in the White House. Employing a didactic tone, Washington deftly sets forth his belief that the black man’s salvation lies in education, industriousness, and self-reliance. This is the true-life story of a man of real courage and dedication.

  • In the late 1800s, John Muir made several trips to the pristine, relatively unexplored territory of Alaska, irresistibly drawn to its awe-inspiring glaciers and its wild menagerie of bears, bald eagles, wolves, and whales. Half poet and half geologist, he recorded his experiences and reflections in Travels in Alaska, a work he was in the process of completing at the time of his death in 1914.

  • Mill’s autobiography deals with but one part of a life, the life of the mind-but a mind that ranks as one of the most remarkable and significant of the nineteenth century. The book memorably depicts the emergence of a brilliant child prodigy, the product of an extraordinary education that both hastened his development and brought him to the brink of suicide by the age of twenty-one; illumined with equal clarity is the story of John Stuart Mill’s renewed commitment to life, and of the further conflicts that marked his long evolution toward maturity as a major philosopher and social thinker. Superb in its dispassionate objectivity, the Autobiography stands as a work of enduring stature and relevance, the final testament of a rare and luminous intelligence.

  • The Prairie marks the final chapter in James Fenimore Cooper’s great saga of American frontiersman Natty Bumppo. Though nearly ninety in 1804, Bumppo, now on the Great Plains, is still a competent frontiersman and trapper. Once more he is drawn into conflict with society in the form of an emigrant party led by the surly Ishmael Bush and his miscreant brother-in-law, Abiram White. And once again, this great man of nature is called upon to exhibit his courage and resourcefulness to rescue the innocent.