Narrator

Brian Emerson

Brian Emerson
  • In uncharted Caprona, a continent lost from the map of the earth, where time had stopped and all the primeval creatures of long-gone ages still prowled, Bowen Tyler was lost. To find Tyler, Tom Billings traveled across the world to Caprona, with all the weaponry the modern world afforded. A light hydroplane would allow him to scale the perilous wall of cliffs that surrounded the island and rifles, pistols, and ammunition would provide protection against the monstrous prehistoric beings Tyler had so vividly described. But even stranger mysteries awaited him where that barbaric civilization hid, torn between the impassable jungle on the one side and an unknown menace on the other.

  • Thomas Sowell has a different idea about how economics should be taught. With this groundbreaking introduction to economics, Sowell has thrown out the graphs, statistics, and jargon. Learning economics, he believes, should be relaxing—and even enjoyable.

    Sowell reveals the general principles behind any kind of economy—capitalist, socialist, feudal, and so on. In understandable language, he shows how to critique economic policies in terms of the incentives they create rather than the goals they proclaim. With clear explanations of the entire field, from rent control and the rise and fall of businesses to the international balance of payments, this is the first book for anyone who wishes to understand how the economy functions.

    In this edition, Basic Economics has been revised and expanded to address the new concerns of the twenty-first century. It's focus has become more international, including the range of economic problems faced by foreign countries around the world. Each chapter reflects the experiences of many different peoples and cultures. In his straightforward style, Sowell demonstrates that the basic principles of economics are not confined by national borders.

  • It’s the end of the world as we know it. Someday soon, you might wake up to the call to prayer of a muezzin. Europeans already do.

    Liberals tell us that “diversity is our strength”—while Talibanic enforcers cruise Greenwich Village burning books and barber shops, the Supreme Court decides that sharia law doesn’t violate the “separation of church and state,” and the Hollywood Left decides to give up on gay rights in favor of the much safer charms of polygamy.

    If you think this can’t happen, you haven’t been paying attention. In this hilarious New York Times bestseller, provocative columnist Mark Steyn uses his trademark wit, clarity of thought, and flair for the apocalyptic to argue that America is the only hope against Islamic terrorism. He addresses the singular position in which America finds itself, surrounded by anti-Americanism on all sides, and gives us the brutal facts on these threats and why there is no choice but for America to fight for the cause of freedom—alone.

  • One of the great secrets of the Cold War, hidden for decades, is revealed at last. Early in 1968, a nuclear-armed Soviet submarine sank in the waters off Hawaii, hundreds of miles closer to American shores than it should have been. Compelling evidence strongly suggests that the sub sank while attempting to fire a nuclear missile.

    We now know that the Soviets had lost track of the sub; it had become a rogue. The Nixon administration launched a clandestine, half-billion-dollar project to recover the sunken K-129. The successful recovery effort helped forge new relations between the US and the Soviets, even as it revealed a treacherous plan to provoke war between the US and China—a plan that, had it succeeded, would have had devastating consequences.

  • Dubbed by Barron’s as “The Shadow CIA,” Stratfor is one of the world’s most respected private global intelligence firms with an unmatched ability to provide clear perspective on the current geopolitical map. Here, drawing on Stratfor’s vast information-gathering network, George Friedman delivers the geopolitical story that the mainstream media has been unable to uncover: the startling truth behind America’s foreign policy and war effort in Afghanistan, Iraq, and beyond.

    In America’s Secret War, Friedman identifies the United States’ most dangerous enemies, delves into presidential strategies of the last quarter century, and reveals the real reasons behind the attack of September 11 and the Bush administration’s motivation for the war in Iraq. Here, in eye-opening detail, is an insightful picture of today’s world that goes far beyond what is reported in the news media.

  • In this classic true adventure story, a young American sea captain named James Riley, shipwrecked off the western coast of North Africa in 1815, is captured by a band of nomadic Arabs and sold into slavery. Thus begins an epic adventure of survival and a quest for freedom that takes him across the Sahara desert.

    This dramatic account of Captain Riley’s trials and sufferings sold more than one million copies in his day and was even read by a young and impressionable Abraham Lincoln. The degradations of a slave existence and the courage to survive under the most harrowing conditions have rarely been recorded with such painful honesty.

    Sufferings in Africa is a classic travel-adventure narrative and a fascinating testament of white Americans enslaved abroad, during a time when slavery flourished throughout the United States.

  • Captain David Grief, South Pacific tycoon, owns plantations and trading stations from New Guinea to Samoa, pearling fisheries in the Paumotus, and rubber acreages in the Louisiades. His own vessels recruit contract labor, and he operates three steamers on ocean runs. He came to the South Seas at the age of twenty and, blessed with a blond skin impervious to tropical rays, browned over two decades into a true “son of the sun.” At forty years of age, he looks no more than thirty. His manifold enterprises flourish. His is the golden touch. Yet he plays the South Seas game not for the gold but for the game’s sake and for the daring life of the island rover.

    Told in Jack London’s graphic and colorful style, David Grief’s adventures are related through these eight long tales of danger and daring:

    “The Son of the Sun”
    “The Proud Goat of Aloysius Pankburn”
    “The Devils of Fuatino”
    “The Jokers of New Gibbon”
    “A Little Account with Swithin Hall”
    “A Goboto Night”
    “The Feathers of the Sun”  
    “The Pearls of Parlay”

  • When Carol Milford, a young, liberated woman from St. Paul, Minnesota, marries small-town doctor Will Kennicott, she suddenly finds herself transplanted to Gopher Prairie. Horrified by her new home, an ugly backwater community, she decides it's time the town made a few changes.

    The story of an idealistic young woman's frustrated attempts to change the set ways of her small town, Main Street has been hailed as one of the essential literary satires of the American scene. An allegory of exile and return, it attacks the complacency and ingrown mores of those who resist change and are under the illusion that they have chosen their tradition. The lonely predicament of Carol Kennicott, caught between her desires for social reform and individual happiness, reflects the position in which America's turn-of-the-century "emancipated woman" found herself. Sinclair Lewis' cutting portrait of the small-minded inhabitants of small-town America is rich with sociological insight that still resonates today.

  • He is a man capable of abandoning two sailors in an open boat, yet he is an avid and thoughtful reader of the moral philosophers. He is Wolf Larsen: captain of the seal-hunting Ghost, the unforgettable protagonist of one of the world's great sea novels. Tormented by his own convictions, Larsen is an enigma both fascinating and repellent to his reluctant crewman, Humphrey Van Weyden. Throughout their long and perilous voyage together, the captain's ruthless belief in the survival of the fittest is pitted against Van Weyden's "civilization"—a contest between two opposing views of life that demonstrates Jack London's gift for expressing complex ideas with exciting action. Together with the other stories selected for this volume, The Sea Wolf is a superb example of the genius of a writer who was, in the words of Maxwell Geismar, "the poet of the savage Darwinian struggle."

  • On Caprona, the Land that Time Forgot, all of the world's savage past still lived. Here were dinosaurs and flying reptiles, here were the most primitive of cavemen, and the last of the Bronze Age barbarians. But there was one more secret that the claws and fangs and sharp-edged spears guarded most of all.

    This is the story of the man who tried to find that final secret. When Bradley, the adventurer, dared to cross the last terrible barrier to the heart of Caprona, he entered a world of wonder, terror, and danger beyond the imagination of any man—except Edgar Rice Burroughs.