Narrator

Roe Kendall

Roe Kendall
  • Men of great wealth bought her love. She gave it to only one.

    Marguerite Gautier, the greatest beauty in Paris, was known to all as “the Lady of the Camellias” because she was never seen without her favorite flowers. She was luxuriously kept by the richest men in France, who thronged to her boudoir to lay their fortunes at her feet. She lived violently, spending herself and her money in reckless abandon. She had many lovers, but she never really loved—until she met Armand Duval.

    Realizing that her only assets in life were her face and figure, Marguerite had learned how to make men pay. But what happens to a cool, calculating beauty when she herself suffers the wound of love?

  • In this classic of social history, the author describes the lives of five lesser-known men and women of the Middle Ages, as well as one famous one. She draws on account books, records, letters, diaries, and wills to make the life of those times as concrete and comprehensible as our own. There are full-length portraits of Bodo, a Frankish peasant in the time of Charlemagne; Marco Polo, the celebrated Venetian traveler—only one of many—of the thirteenth century; Madame Eglentyne, the prioress of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, whose life can be copiously filled out from the records of the nunneries of fourteenth-century England; the young wife of a fourteenth-century Parisian bourgeois; and two English merchants of the fifteenth century, Thomas Betson of the wool trade and Thomas Paycocke, an Essex clothier.

    This is an informative yet entertaining look at an era through the eyes of people that lived it.

  • Sir Arthur T. Quiller-Couch here gives us these four fairy tales that have been perennial favorites for centuries. The first three fairy tales are “The Sleeping Beauty,” “Blue Beard,” and “Cinderella,” all three of which were popularized in France by Charles Perrault in 1697 in hisTales of Mother Goose. The last tale in the compilation is “Beauty and the Beast,” this version attributed to Gabrielle de Villeneuve, who published it in 1740 and 1756.

    Quiller-Couch had this to say regarding his translation of these tales: “I began by translating Perrault’s tales, very nearly word for word…the translations, when finished, did not satisfy me, and so I turned back to the beginning and have rewritten the stories in my own way, which (as you may say with the Irish butler) ‘may not be the best claret, but ‘tis the best we’ve got…’”