Narrator

Marguerite Gavin

Marguerite Gavin
  • Overcome anxiety by facing fear

    Proven tips and tools. There are a lot of resources out there for managing anxiety. However, many of them are based on opinion rather than science. Dr. Craig April, founder of the April Center for Anxiety Attack Management, relies on the latter. By employing cognitive behavioral therapy, a research-proven method for anxiety treatment, readers can find the breakthrough they desire.

    No-nonsense approach. Assuming the role of victim when it comes to anxiety can make us feel trapped and convince us that we have no control in getting better. However, Dr. April shares that, in most of its forms, anxiety is not a mental illness. For this reason, he takes a stripped-down approach to tackling anxiety that looks at the root: false fear messages.

    Fear is part of the human condition. Fear is a factor in all lives, whether we feel it plays a significant role in controlling us or not. However, it is also something that can be faced. By recognizing anxiety as a result of false fear messages, we become better equipped to manage it. An expert on cognitive behavioral therapy focused on anxiety relief, Dr. April is equipped with over twenty years of experience and seeks to help readers face their fears and overcome anxiety.

    Read The Anxiety Getaway and discover:

    • Methods that have been demonstrated to be effective at the April Center for Anxiety Attack Management
    • Tips and practical tools for facing fear
    • A non-victim approach to help you take back control and reclaim your life


  • The Women Who Wrote Their Way Into History

    A packed timeline of the greatest women writers: From the first recorded writer to current bestsellers, Becca Anderson takes us through time and highlights women who have left their mark on the literary world. This expansive compilation of women writers is a chance to delve deeper into the lives and works of renowned authors and learn about some lesser known greats, as well. Some of the many women writers you will love learning about are: Maya Angelou, Jane Austen, Judy Blume, Rachel Carson, Nadine Gordimer, Margaret Mead, Joyce Carol Oates, and many, many more.

    Explore every subject and literary form women writers have to offer: The works of these awesome women writers vary greatly―each is as unique and significant as the women who penned them. With the help of writers, editors, librarians, booksellers, and more, Anderson has crafted a must-read book for women of every background.

    Celebrate the impact women have made in our culture: This feminist book is a beacon of brilliance. It is the perfect gift for artists, intellectuals, and anyone who seeks to be inspired by words and profound lives. Most of all, it is a celebration of the journeys and accomplishments of women who have worked to have their voices heard in black and white letters across the world.

    Crack open The Book of Awesome Women Writers today, and you will find

    • engaging chapters such as “Prolific Pens,” “Mystics and Madwomen,” and “Banned, Blacklisted, and Arrested”;
    • a plethora of necessary new additions to your reading list; and
    • confirmation that the female voice is not only awesome, but an essential part of literary culture.

    If you enjoyed titles such as Girls Who Rocked the World, The Book of Awesome Women, and In the Company of Women, then you’ll love The Book of Awesome Women Writers.

  • An inspirational gift for women

    In her book Victory for the Vote, women’s history expert Doris Weatherford offers an engaging and detailed narrative history of women’s seven-decade fight for the vote, and the continuing current-day struggle for human rights and equality.

    Foreword by Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi

    Victory for the Vote puts the fight for suffrage into contemporary context by discussing key challenges for women in the decades that followed 1920, such as reproductive rights, the Equal Rights Amendment, and political power.

    Celebrate the Centennial of women’s right to vote in the US

    Victory for the Vote is an expansion and update of Doris Weatherford’s A History of the American Suffragist Movement, published in 1998 in honor of the 150th anniversary of the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, considered to be the beginning of the women’s rights movement in the United States.

    Listen to Doris Weatherford’s Victory for the Vote and

    • take pride in the struggles and accomplishments of strong women,
    • understand and appreciate the Women’s Suffrage Movement and the Nineteenth Amendment, and
    • celebrate feminism and recognize the challenges that still remain on the road to human rights for all.

    If you enjoyed books such as Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, The Woman’s Hour, Rad Women Worldwide, Warriors Don’t Cry, or The Book of Awesome Women, you will want to listen to and be inspired by Victory for the Vote.

  • A change in course can be refreshing … when it’s done together.

    1871. After two disastrous marriages, beauty columnist Amalia Truitt’s life is finally her own—well, it will be if she can get herself back to Delaware and demand access to her share of the Truitt family fortune. After all, the charity she’s organized for women who can’t afford their own divorces won’t fund itself.

    However, not everyone wants her to reach her destination. When her family learns she’s been receiving anonymous death threats, a solo journey is out of the question.

    Enter David Zisskind, the ragtag-peddler-turned-soldier whose heart Amalia broke years ago. He’s a Pinkerton now, and the promotion he craves depends on protecting his long-lost love on the unexpectedly treacherous journey across Pennsylvania.

    That their physical connection has endured the test of time (and then some) is problematic, to say the least.

    In very close quarters, with danger lurking around every curve, with each kiss and illicit touch, the wrongs of the past are righted. But David can’t weather another rejection, especially with his career in jeopardy. And Amalia can’t possibly take a lover, never mind another husband … not with so much depending on her repaired reputation. Not when she’s hurt David—her David—so badly before.

  • He’s her ticket into high society …

    Banking heiress Ursula Nunes has lived her life on the fringes of Philadelphia’s upper class. Her Jewish heritage means she’s never quite been welcomed by society’s elite … and her quick temper has never helped, either.

    A faux engagement to the scion of the mid-Atlantic’s most storied family might work to repair her rumpled reputation and gain her entrée to the life she thinks she wants … if she can ignore the way her “betrothed” makes her feel warm all over and stay focused on her goal.

    She’s his ticket out …

    Former libertine John Thaddeus “Jay” Truitt is hardly the man to teach innocent women about propriety. Luckily, high society has little to do with being proper and everything to do with identifying your foe’s temptation—an art form Jay mastered long ago. A broken engagement will give him the perfect excuse to run off to Europe and a life of indulgence.

    But when the game turns too personal, all bets are off …

  • A child disappears. A foster mother faces an impossible choice. A baby’s future hangs in the balance.

    When Deb Moerke and her husband decided to become foster parents, they never imagined how their lives would change. And never did they imagine their worst nightmare coming true: their five-year-old foster daughter, Hannah, murdered at the hands of her birth mom, Karen.

    The Moerkes were overwhelmed with horror and grief. And just when they didn’t think they could bear any more, Deb received a phone call from Karen in prison. Facing a life sentence for Hannah’s murder, she was pregnant. And Karen had an incredible request: Would Deb take her unborn baby in and love it as her own?

    How would you respond? Could you show God’s love to someone who had hurt you and taken away everything you held dear?

    Murder, Motherhood, and Miraculous Grace is an unbelievable true story of faith, family, and a journey toward seemingly impossible forgiveness. A story that tests the limits of the human heart, it’s ultimately a beautiful, life-affirming testament to how unconditional love and relentless obedience can transform even the darkest of nights into mornings of hope.

  • TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN

    From his youth as a liar, gambler, and pool shark to manhood as an indefatigable witness for his Lord Jesus Christ, Dawson Trotman revolutionized the practice of evangelism and founded one of the most widespread and respected Christian organizations in the world today.

    What moved and motivated this extraordinary man of God?

    In Daws, you’ll experience the convictions and passions that guided Trotman’s life: his deep love of God’s Word, his lifelong dedication to prayer, and his determination to live out the Great Commission. This moving historical account, drawn from the memories of those whose lives he touched and from the author’s firsthand knowledge, will both encourage you in your faith and inspire you to action.

  • Brain researchers in recent years have discovered the vast, untapped potential of the brain’s little-used, right hemisphere. Art therapist Lucia Capacchione discovered that our nondominant hand is a direct channel to that potential. Her research and fieldwork with people using their “other hand” provides the raw material for this classic, first published in 1988.

    In workshops and private sessions, Lucia has worked with thousands of people, employing these techniques to help them become more creative, expressive, and intuitive in their day-to-day lives and also experience improved health and greater fulfillment in their relationships.

    Lucia will show you how to

    • channel the deep inner wisdom of your true self,
    • change negative attitudes about yourself,
    • unlock creativity,
    • uncover hidden artistic abilities, and
    • heal your relationships.

    Through various drawing and writing exercises, Lucia Capacchione hopes you will discover the power that lies hidden in your other hand. The techniques will help you explore and understand your thoughts and feelings on a completely different level and reconnect with a sense of playfulness you may have left behind in childhood.

  • Hope for every mom who needs an escape―not from motherhood, but from the things stealing your joy

    Motherhood often looks like bottomless piles of laundry; a sink full of dishes; sleepless nights; and unshowered, nonstop, endless days. If that’s all there is, then no wonder “Grumpy Mom” sometimes sneaks into your heart and home.

    If you can relate, you’re in good company―Valerie Woerner gets it and has experienced Grumpy Mom more often than she’d care to admit. In Grumpy Mom Takes a Holiday, Valerie shares what she’s learned so far about sending Grumpy Mom packing and embracing a joyful, intentional motherhood that is so much better than you thought possible.

    As you journey with Valerie, you’ll be inspired and equipped to find energy in the most unlikely places, pursue your own dreams, be set free from mom guilt, feel content despite unfinished to-do lists, spend purposeful time with God amid the daily chaos, and discover more joyous moments of motherhood.

    So take a holiday from Grumpy Mom, and enjoy life as the mom God made you to be.

  • An intelligent, strong-willed woman, Susanna Wesley suffered much in a male-dominated world while she prepared her children to succeed in it.

    Her fiery, independent spirit is evident as Arnold Dallimore sets the mother of Methodism within her culture and time in England. Though Samuel Wesley figures prominently in his wife’s story, as do John, Charles, and the other children, the story remains fixed on Susanna.

    Excerpts from Susanna Wesley’s letters and writings of her husband and children are included.

  • What she doesn’t know …

    The victims are all found face-down in the murky waters of the creek that runs through Cherokee Pointe, Tennessee. They are naked, except for the black satin ribbon tied around their necks. And each murdered woman shares a single characteristic … they are all redheads …

    Just might …

    Socialite Reve Sorrell has come to Cherokee Pointe seeking answers about her family history and her shocking connection to wrong-side-of-the-tracks Jazzy Talbot. With their stunning good looks and shining red hair, the two are mirror images of each other—twins abandoned at birth and raised in very different worlds. And whoever left them for dead on a cold night thirty years ago isn’t about to let them uncover the truth now …

    Kill her

    As a serial killer leaves another chilling calling card in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains, Reve turns to Sheriff Jacob Butler to help her unravel the potentially deadly secrets of her past. But someone will do anything to stop her … someone who won’t make the same mistake twice … someone more cunning than she knows … and closer than she ever could imagine …

  • Nancy Kress returns with Terran Tomorrow, the final book in the thrilling hard SF trilogy based on the Nebula Award–winning novella Yesterday’s Kin.

    The diplomatic mission from Earth to World ended in disaster, as the Earth scientists discovered that the Worlders were not the scientifically advanced culture they believed. Though they brought a limited quantity of the vaccine against the deadly spore cloud, there was no way to make enough to vaccinate more than a few dozen. The Earth scientists, and surviving diplomats, fled back to Earth.

    But once home, after the twenty-eight-year gap caused by the spaceship transit, they find an Earth changed almost beyond recognition. In the aftermath of the spore cloud plague, the human race has been reduced to only a few million isolated survivors. The knowledge brought back by Marianne Jenner and her staff may not be enough to turn the tide of ongoing biological warfare.

  • Be careful who you love …

    Cherokee Pointe, Tennessee, has seen murder before, but nothing like what has claimed the life of Jamie Upton, heir to the Upton fortune. The crime is so vicious, so personal, and filled with hatred, the authorities are certain it had to be someone he knew … someone hiding an unimaginable sadistic streak behind a friendly façade.

    Be careful who you trust …

    The number one suspect is Jamie’s former lover Jazzy Talbot. The girl from the wrong side of the tracks has always been Cherokee Point’s favorite target for gossip and worse. Jazzy knows she didn’t kill Jamie … just as she knows she’s being watched, stalked like prey …

    Be careful what you know …

    And then the killer strikes again … and again … with the same chilling signature. With no one to believe her innocence except enigmatic drifter Caleb McCord, Jazzy plunges into a small town’s long-buried secrets and shocking family sins … each startling truth bringing her dangerously close to a killer determined to make Jazzy the last to die …

  • Some things shouldn’t be seen …

    Cherokee Pointe, Tennessee. Deep in the Smoky Mountains, the victim lies, sacrificed on a makeshift altar—the gruesome work of a killer who has evaded the authorities in state after state. FBI agent Dallas Sloan knows the scene all too well—just as he knows the killings won’t stop until there are four more bodies.

    Some warnings won’t be heeded …

    Genny Madoc’s “sixth sense” has brought many of Cherokee Pointe’s residents to her isolated log cabin, looking for help. But now it’s Genny who needs help from the disturbing visions she sees—images that are getting stronger and more violent day by day.

    Some fears can’t be stopped …

    Thrown together by necessity, drawn to each other by desire, Dallas and Genny must band together, searching the darkest heart of a town’s hidden secrets before a twisted killer can complete a sinister plan that will make one of them the fifth victim.

  • In 1975, two centuries after her birth, Pope Paul VI canonized Elizabeth Ann Seton, making her the first saint to be a native-born citizen of the United States in the Roman Catholic Church. Seton came of age in Manhattan as the city and her family struggled to rebuild themselves after the Revolution, explored both contemporary philosophy and Christianity, converted to Catholicism from her native Episcopalian faith, and built the St. Joseph’s Academy and Free School in Emmitsburg, Maryland. Hers was an exemplary early American life of struggle, ambition, questioning, and faith, and in this flowing biography, Catherine O’Donnell has given Seton her due.

    O’Donnell places Seton squarely in the context of the dynamic and risky years of the American and French Revolutions and their aftermath. Just as Seton’s dramatic life was studded with hardship, achievement, and grief, so were the social, economic, political, and religious scenes of the early American republic in which she lived. O’Donnell provides the listener with a strong sense of this remarkable woman’s intelligence and compassion as she withstood her husband’s financial failures and untimely death, undertook a slow conversion to Catholicism, and struggled to reconcile her single-minded faith with her respect for others’ different choices. The fruit of her labors were the creation of a spirituality that embraced human connections as well as divine love and the American Sisters of Charity, part of an enduring global community with a specific apostolate for teaching.

    The trove of correspondence, journals, reflections, and community records that O’Donnell weaves together throughout Elizabeth Seton provides deep insight into her life and her world. Each source enriches our understanding of women’s friendships and choices, illuminates the relationships within the often-opaque world of early religious communities, and upends conventional wisdom about the ways Americans of different faiths competed and collaborated during the nation’s earliest years. Through her close and sympathetic reading of Seton’s letters and journals, O’Donnell reveals Seton the person and shows us how, with both pride and humility, she came to understand her own importance as Mother Seton in the years before her death in 1821.

  • When they investigate a string of disappearances of young girls, will Jenny Weston and Zoe Zola be dispatched with extreme pride and prejudice?

    Amateur sleuth and little librarian Jenny Wilson is set on edge when the police discover a young girl’s body, dressed in an old-fashioned white lace dress, just outside Bear Falls. And when another local girl from town disappears soon after, Jenny and her next-door neighbor, author and little person Zoe Zola, know they have to help the beleaguered police chief.

    But first, Jenny and Zoe have new neighbors to meet: a trio of wealthy newcomers from Chicago has just moved into a huge mansion on Lake Michigan. Nathan and Delia Wickley are genial siblings, and Fitzwilliam Dillon, the mansion’s owner, is a little person like Zoe. It is a truth universally acknowledged that a rich gentleman seeking to ingratiate himself to his new neighbors will spread a bit of largesse around, and Fitzwilliam is no exception: he has offered two million dollars to Bear Falls. But the townspeople are far from agreed on what to do with the money―and the deliberations are far from peaceful.

    But it’ll all come to naught if the missing girl isn’t found and the culprit identified. And when she ventures alone to a mysterious structure in the woods, Zoe may not live to resolve her romantic dilemmas. Though neither Jenny nor Zoe is particularly placid or even-tempered, love and danger beckon them.

  • Filled with clear and practical solutions, this step-by-step, room-by-room guide to simple home modifications helps seniors make their homes safer and easier to navigate.

    Lynda Shrager is a registered board-certified occupational therapist, a master’s-level social worker, and a certified aging-in-place specialist (CAPS) with more than thirty-seven years’ experience in the field of geriatrics and more than thirteen years working with seniors in their homes. It is this mix of qualifications and experience that makes her an expert in adapting environments to increase patient safety and independence. Age in Place is designed to help seniors and their caregivers address these new challenges together and make life at home safer, more manageable, and less stressful for all.

    Age in Place features the following:

    • A room-by-room walk-through to evaluate and modify safety
    • Recommendations for the best home medical equipment
    • Where to obtain services and additional helpful resources
    • A check list for listeners to complete their own walk-through, with a quick and easy guide to making each space safe and manageable
    • Occupational therapy tips in “Hacks for Health and Home” sections at the end of each chapter
    • A “Vital Documents Guide” for easy retrieval of important papers in case of an emergency
  • Life becomes more complicated than usual for LAPD Captain Josie Corsino after she chairs a disciplinary board that recommends firing a five-year police officer with a poor performance record and a history of irrational behavior. During his board of rights, the officer swears vengeance against her and anyone he believes is responsible for ruining his life and career.

    When one of the board members, a prominent gay civil rights attorney, is shot to death outside a Hollywood gay bar, another board member ambushed, and Josie’s home firebombed, the obvious suspect is the unstable officer, and he soon becomes the target of an intense manhunt causing havoc and fear among those who knew him.

    At the same time, Josie and her homicide supervisor Red Behan are trying to find a serial killer in Hollywood who is targeting young gay men. One of his victims is a police commissioner’s brother, so there’s department pressure to solve that case and political pressure to unravel the mystery of the slain attorney.

    Behan is Josie’s best detective, but he’s retiring in less than a week, which increases the pressure on her to quickly and successfully conclude both investigations. Adding to her stress is the realization that she is once again in love but knows her job is toxic for married life.

    It’s only after her team finally captures their serial killer that everything falls into place and she knows the truth.

  • Wits Guts Grit is inspired by the many what-if questions acclaimed science writer and mother of two Jena Pincott asked herself as research on how the invisible forces that shape our minds and health has emerged and grown over the past decade.

    • What if we identify the microbes that support stress resilience, find ways to expose our kids to them, and then test them?
    • What if we reintroduce the mineral magnesium, deficient in almost every child’s diet? Would it reduce anxiety and increase bounce-back, as the science now suggests?
    • What if memory and learning could improve measurably after eating certain foods—such as blueberries—high in plant chemicals called flavonols?
    • What if primal ways of moving the body strengthen kids’ working memory and mental flexibility?
    • What if receiving the right types of touch translates into better emotional control and self-regulation?

    These and many more questions led Pincott to simple, all-natural “biohacks”—or experiments inspired by current research and theory—complete with instructions on how to undertake them to help your own children strengthen their wits, guts, and grit. Explaining the science and her own experimentation with her two gung-ho daughters in a lively, humorous, accessible way, Pincott guides parents to learn how the underlying ingredients of the traits we all want for our kids—resilience, focus, perseverance, working memory, and more—may be all around us in the natural world, ready to be harnessed.

  • Nancy Kress returns with the sequel of Tomorrow’s Kin, part of an all-new hard science fiction trilogy based on a Nebula Award-winning novella

    Ten years after the aliens left Earth, humanity has succeeded in building a ship, Friendship, in which to follow them home to Kindred. Aboard are a crew of scientists, diplomats, and a squad of Rangers to protect them. But when the Friendship arrives, they find nothing they expected: no interplanetary culture, no industrial base, and no cure for the spore disease.

    A timeslip in the apparently instantaneous travel between worlds has occurred, and far more than ten years have passed.

    Once again scientists find themselves in a race against time to save humanity and their kind from a deadly virus while a clock of a different sort runs down on a military solution no less deadly to all. Amid devastation and plague come stories of heroism and sacrifice and of genetic destiny and free choice, with its implicit promise of conscious change.

  • In August 2012, a baby girl was born without a right or left hemisphere of her brain. Doctors said she was essentially in a vegetative state, unable to see or hear—that there was no hope for her. Relinquished by her birth parents under the state’s Safe Haven Law, this two-week-old unnamed baby girl found her way to Cori and Mark Salchert’s home. Despite the infant’s grim medical diagnosis, Cori knew she couldn’t allow this beautiful baby girl to spend her few days on Earth alone and unloved. Cori took the baby girl home and named her Emmalynn.

    I Will Love You Forever reveals one woman’s decades-long quest to find healing and redemption after the accidental death of her sister as a child. Since 2012, God has used hospice babies—those left to live and die without family to care for them—to mend Cori’s broken heart. Bringing these fragile hospice babies into their home, Cori and her family have promised not only to hold them briefly, until their last breath on this side of heaven, but to love them forever and always. The loving actions of Cori and her family show that we can do all things through Christ who gives us strength.

    Cori’s poignant story will strengthen your faith and touch your heart.

  • Women today are fading. In a female culture built on Photoshopped perfection and Pinterest fantasies, we’ve lost the ability to dream our own big dreams. So busy trying to do it all and have it all, we’ve missed the life we were really designed for. And we are paying the price. The rise of loneliness, depression, and anxiety among the female population in Western cultures is at an all-time high. Overall, women are two-and-a-half times more likely to take antidepressants than men. What is it about our culture, the expectations, and our way of life that is breaking women down in unprecedented ways?

    In this vulnerable memoir of transformation, Rebekah Lyons shares her journey from Atlanta, Georgia, to the heart of Manhattan, where she found herself blindsided by crippling depression and anxiety. Overwhelmed by the pressure to be domestically efficient, professionally astute, and physically attractive, Rebekah finally realized that freedom can come only by facing our greatest fears and fully surrendering to God’s call on our lives. This book is an invitation for all women to take that first step toward freedom, for it is only when we free-fall that we can truly fly.

  • Aliens have landed in New York.

    A deadly cloud of spores has already infected and killed the inhabitants of two worlds. Now the plague is heading for Earth, threatening humans and aliens alike. Can either species be trusted to find the cure?

    Geneticist Marianne Jenner is immersed in the desperate race to save humanity, yet her family is tearing itself apart. Siblings Elizabeth and Ryan are strident isolationists who agree only that an alien conspiracy is in play. Marianne’s youngest, Noah, is a loner addicted to a drug that constantly changes his identity. But between the four Jenners, the course of human history will be forever altered.

    Earth’s most elite scientists have ten months to prevent human extinction—but not everyone is willing to wait.

  • The Los Angeles Times affectionately referred to Freddy Powers as the “Ol’ Blue Eyes of Country Music,” and wrote that if you were to “ask country superstars Willie Nelson, George Jones, or Merle Haggard (they’ll) … tell you that he’s one of country music’s best-kept secrets.”

    The Texas Country Music Hall of Fame inductee has been to the top of the charts as both a producer for Willie Nelson’s Grammy-winning LP Over the Rainbow, and as a songwriter for many of country music legend Merle Haggard’s number one hits.

    Now, for the first time, Freddy recounts the entertaining and emotional stories behind his decades-long roller coaster ride through the music business; his voyage to the top of the charts, and his inspiring battle against Parkinson’s disease. Helping Freddy tell his story are exclusive interviews from fellow country music legends Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, John Rich, Tanya Tucker, The Voice finalist and Powers’ protégé Mary Sarah, along with a host of other Nashville luminaries.

  • When the man who raped Scottsdale private investigator Lena Jones when she was a nine-year-old foster child is released from prison, Lena is waiting for him in the parking lot—with a big knife. “Papa” Brian Wycoff survives their meeting, but the next day, his wife, who knew about his crimes but did nothing to stop him—in fact enabled him—is found dead in their Apache Junction home, shot through both eyes. Terrified he will be next, Wycoff violates his parole and flees north to the small town of Black Canyon City, taking shelter in an RV on his brother-in-law’s small ranch. A couple of days later, he is found tortured to death, eight horizontal marks burned into his flesh. One for each of his victims?

    Suspicion first falls upon Lena, who has trailed Wycoff to Black Canyon City to make sure he doesn’t come near any other children. When the local authorities arrive to question her, she admits to having been tempted to kill her former foster father but that someone beat her to the punch. Suspicion then falls on Wycoff’s other victims, the now-grown men and women he abused when they were still in his care, and on the mothers of the children who went missing before his arrest.

    When Lena takes up the case, more to protect one of the mothers who has been arrested than to find the real killer, her conscience is torn. Does a serial child rapist, a pedophile also implicated in the disappearance of several children, really deserve justice? That choice might not be left up to Lena when members of a local group, Parents of Missing Children, start working to prevent her investigation from succeeding. How far will they go to make sure she fails?

  • Yes, you can read anyone like a book!

    Reading body language is a gateway to understanding why people act the way they do. It’s not just a matter of understanding their true emotions but also of identifying their true motivation.

    In The Art of Body Talk, the authors share their highly successful READ (Review, Evaluate, Analyze, Decide) system of understanding body language, but with an exciting twist: they give you the skills to use READ to see what’s behind those eye movements, gestures, and twitches, the skills to go inside the head of your source! Why stop at “what” when reading body language? The Art of Body Talk shows you how to

    • go all the way to “why”―the driving force behind the actions;
    • discover how to get past your filters so you aren’t tricked by your own misperceptions; and
    • learn how to apply the skills in business and in your personal life.

    The Art of Body Talk gives you the fastest, most efficient method to read anyone’s body language. You will easily be able to perceive the emotions and spot the messages people are really sending―whether they know it or not (and whether they want to or not!).

  • Jenny Weston and her mother, Dora, have been receiving strange midnight visits. The town of Bear Falls, Michigan, has its own elusive and highly secretive poet, Emily Sutton, who has lived her life cloistered away with her sister in a house at the edge of Pewee Swamp. But now, Emily has started leaving scraps of poetry in Dora’s little free library, and Dora makes it her mission to befriend the sheltered woman.

    Meanwhile Zoe Zola—almost famous author, little person, and the Westons’ quirky next-door neighbor—is hard at work on a new book, this one about the inner life of Emily Dickinson. And once again, Zoe’s literary work starts making uncanny connections with the events in her own world as Emily Sutton reemerges into society. But Zoe begins to suspect things aren’t anywhere near normal at Emily’s swamp house or in the lives of the people she claims have abandoned her—until looking further into the poet’s half-truths leads Zoe and Jenny to a horrible murder.

    The chaos surrounding the ensuing investigation grows even more hectic with Emily’s increasingly erratic behavior, the arrival of a young woman searching for her missing poet uncle, and yet another betrayal in Jenny’s love life.

    And only poetry can set the truth free.

  • When Jerzy Schroeder, a shadowy gray-market hustler and aspiring crony capitalist, is murdered while Josie Kendall is hitting him up for a million dollars to help him cash in on alternative-energy funding, the police suspect her of adultery and her husband, Rafe, of homicide. Josie, who works for Majority Values Coalition, an “activist fundraising organization,” is a new but passionate Washington, DC, player. Rafe, long a Washington insider, is passionate about Josie and about supporting her learning curve on how Washington works.

    For Josie and Rafe, this isn’t a murder investigation but a political damage-control problem. They’ll need a full arsenal, since, as one capital insider points out, “A damage control strategy that hasn’t succeeded within thirty days has failed.” They attack the issue with an array of finely tuned skills: strategic leaks, manipulation of the media, judicious use of inside information, and a flexible attitude toward the truth―plus the assistance of Josie’s Uncle Darius, a veteran spin doctor with surprising connections, who is, luckily, out on parole. Along the way, Josie will have to decide whether there are ethical lines that even she won’t cross.

    In this House of Cards scenario, determining who actually murdered Schroeder is a low-priority problem, but Josie manages to do that as well. It’s all in a day’s—or, rather, thirty days’—work.

  • A brand-new anthology of stories inspired by the Arthur Conan Doyle canon

    In this follow-up to the acclaimed In the Company of Sherlock Holmes, expert Sherlockians Laurie King and Leslie Klinger put forth the question: What happens when great writers/creators who are not known as Sherlock Holmes devotees admit to being inspired by Conan Doyle stories? While some are highly regarded mystery writers, others are best known for their work in the fields of fantasy or science fiction. All of these talented authors, however, share a great admiration for Arthur Conan Doyle and his greatest creations, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.

    To the editors’ great delight, these stories go in many directions. Some explore the spirit of Holmes himself; others tell of detectives inspired by Holmes’ adventures or methods. A young boy becomes a detective; a young woman sharpens her investigative skills; an aging actress and a housemaid each find that they have unexpected talents. Other characters from the Holmes stories are explored, and even non-Holmesian tales by Conan Doyle are echoed. The variations are endless!

    Although not a formal collection of new Sherlock Holmes stories, some entries do fit that mold while others were inspired by the Conan Doyle canon. The results are breathtaking, for fans of Holmes and Watson as well as listeners new to Doyle’s writing.

  • Told from multiple points of view—including James and Dolley Madison and a British admiral—this is the true story of the burning of the White House in 1814.

    It’s unimaginable today, even for a generation that saw the Twin Towers fall and the Pentagon attacked. It’s unimaginable because in 1814, enemies didn’t fly overhead; they marched through the streets, and for twenty-six hours in August, the British enemy marched through Washington, DC, and set fire to government buildings, including the US Capitol and the White House.

    Relying on firsthand accounts, historian Jane Hampton Cook weaves together several different narratives to create a vivid, multidimensional account of the burning of Washington, including the escalation that led to it and the immediate aftermath. From James and Dolley Madison to the British admiral who ordered the White House set aflame, historical figures are brought to life through their experience of this unprecedented attack. The Burning of the White House is the story of a city invaded, a presidential family displaced, a nation humbled, and an American spirit that somehow remained unbroken.

  • In Mississippi Noir, literary crime fiction master Tom Franklin has assembled a phenomenal short-story collection that highlights a mesmerizing and diverse set of styles and subject matter. Urban, suburban, and rural settings alike unveil new shades of darkness that fall upon Mississippi’s past and present.

    Mississippi Noir features brand-new stories by Ace Atkins, William Boyle, Megan Abbott, Jack Pendarvis, Dominiqua Dickey, Michael Kardos, Jamie Paige, Jimmy Cajoleas, Chris Offutt, Michael Farris Smith, Andrew Paul, Lee Durkee, Robert Busby, John M. Floyd, RaShell R. Smith-Spears, and Mary Miller.

  • Jenny Weston moves home to Bear Falls, Michigan, to nurse her bruised ego back to health after a bitter divorce. But the idyllic vision of her charming hometown crumbles when her mother’s little library is destroyed.

    The next-door neighbor, Zoe Zola, a little person and Lewis Carroll enthusiast, suspects local curmudgeon Adam Cane. But when he’s suddenly found dead in Zoe’s fairy garden, all roads lead back to her. Jenny, however, believes Zoe is innocent, so the two women team up to find the true culprit, investigating the richest family in Bear Falls, interrogating a few odd townspeople, and delving into old, hidden transgressions—until another body turns up.

    Inspired by Alice in Wonderland, Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli’s quaint and compelling series debut will delight cozy mystery fans new and old.

  • Murder by witchcraft? Private investigator and former beauty queen Madeline Maclin thought she’d seen it all in her small North Carolina town of Celosia. Yet Evil Turns, fifth in the lively series by Jane Tesh, opens with a young man’s body covered in strange occult symbols found in a local vineyard, putting Mac on notice that there is more than one witch in the neighborhood.

    Years ago, a group of women in town formed Darkrose Coven, a practice now taken up by younger residents who insist that their dark rose tattoos only honor their favorite character from the popular Pagan Desires books and movies. Has the old coven reappeared? Is the new coven responsible for the ritualistic murder? Intrigue unfolds as Celosia prepares for its centennial.

    The Women’s Improvement Society, led by wealthy, obnoxious Amanda Price, plans to create an outdoor musical drama, Flower of the South, extolling Emmaline Ross, one of the state’s first vintners. Amanda steamrolls past City Councilmember Harold Stover, who fears Celosia cannot afford this costly venture, and Nathan Fenton, who refuses to let her use his Camp Lakenwood land for the production. When Harold is murdered, Amanda is the prime suspect and she hires Mac to prove her innocence. Are the two murders connected? What about Megan Underwood, a local Wiccan from the defunct Peaceful Meadow commune, which had ties to the Darkrose Coven?

    Megan complicates Mac’s inquiries, drifting in and out of town claiming she is Emmaline reborn. What is the secret the Darkrose Coven is so desperate to hide? Mac is stretched to the limit. Not only is she juggling her time investigating murder suspects, feuding locals, and a long-ago missing infant, she also has to fend off threats by a disreputable goon from her husband’s past. Her talented and charming spouse, Jerry Fairweather, had once been a con artist, and now their current life together, committed to the straight and narrow, could be totally wrecked. Madeline needs magic of her own to unravel the twists and turns of tangled relationships and to find one singular lost soul.

  • Amid a sultry Atlanta summer, someone is targeting police. The investigation becomes personal for APD Detective Ryan Winter when a colleague and friend is shot dead—the second victim in weeks. But even as he finds himself being drawn into the tense hunt for a serial cop killer, he is forced to reexamine his own shattering personal tragedy.

    An ER physician at Atlanta's busy Mercy Hospital, Dr. Lydia Costa is no stranger to suffering. Still, the recent police slayings reopen barely healed wounds—and bring her face-to-face with her ex-husband, Ryan Winter. As the body count rises and paranoia tightens its grip on the police force, Lydia and Ryan are pulled together by circumstances and fate, causing old passions to reignite despite their painful shared past. But as Ryan moves closer to discovering the killer's identity, someone is watching, placing both him and Lydia in mortal danger.

  • Ferociously ambitious US senatorial candidate Juliana Thorsson has been keeping a secret. The horrific slaughter of a prominent doctor, his wife, and their ten-year-old son inside their Scottsdale home brings Thorsson to private investigator Lena Jones. The slain family's fourteen-year-old, Alison, and her boyfriend, Kyle, have confessed to the murders. Thorsson wants to hire Lena to discover if Alison is telling the truth, but before accepting the job, Lena demands to know why a rising political star wants to involve herself with the fate of a girl she's never met. Desperate for Lena's help, Thorsson reveals her explosive secret—that Alison is the candidate's biological daughter, a fact she's kept hidden for years. But that's not all. Thorsson then confides something even more unusual than a mere hidden pregnancy—something that could ruin her political plans forever.

    Suspecting that Alison's parents had secrets of their own that could have led to the murders, Lena finally accepts Thorsson's assignment. But interviewing those who knew the family well soon puts Lena—now a strong defender of the two teens—in danger of her life.

    Fast paced, probing, and filled with the trademark twists of the Lena Jones series, Desert Rage once again displays that Betty Webb is unsparing of her characters yet writes their stories with wit and compassion.

  • This delightful and interesting account of Pilgrims is written especially for children. It explores the religious oppression of the Pilgrims in England, their escape to Holland and eventual crossing to America on the Mayflower, and their early days in New England. Based on historical fact, the stories are filled with details of everyday life and vivid characterization of Pilgrim families as they struggle to maintain their faith in the New World. The Brewster children and other Pilgrim boys and girls are the center of interest. This is a wonderful book to listen to in the weeks before Thanksgiving.

  • When eleven-year-old Katy Sue loses her mother to meningitis, she and her family must adjust to life without her. The rural farm in the 1940s provides a natural backdrop that is rhythmic and routine but unforgiving, even when a family member dies. The house’s emptiness is filled only when her Aunt Katherine comes to the family’s aid, as does Jake, a family friend.

    Katy Sue, the youngest of the three children, struggles to understand what the loss of her mother means for her now. With the guidance of her teacher, she begins to imagine her future through drawing, a process that allows her to accept her father’s soon-to-be wife, the farm life without her mother, and, eventually, her own role within the family.

  • Dimple Lala doesn't know what to think. Her parents are from India, and she's spent her whole life resisting their traditions. Then suddenly she gets to high school and everything Indian is trendy. Now things are more complicated than ever. At seventeen, she's still recovering from a year-old break up and her best friend isn't around the way she used to be. To make matters worse, her parents arrange for her to meet a "suitable boy." Of course, it doesn't go well—until Dimple goes to a club and finds him spinning a magical web of words and music. Suddenly the boy is suitable because of his sheer unsuitability, and complications ensue.

    This is a funny, thoughtful story about finding yourself, finding your friends, finding love, and finding your culture—sometimes where you least expect it.

  • Twelve-year-old Aurora is an artist like her father. Through a hundred drawing lessons, he has guided her hand, trained her eye, taught her how to mix colors and achieve perspective. Together they plan to paint a beautiful mural for Rory's mother, maybe a sunset because she always misses the real sunset while she's at her job, supporting the family.

    Rory goes to find her father in his studio so she can show him her sketch for the mural. But when she arrives, she finds him kissing his model. Outraged, she tries to hurt him by burning up her sketchbook, and her father leaves. Rory is devastated and stops painting altogether. Finally, she realizes that she has to talk to her father.

  • Lois McMaster Bujold returns to the vivid, perilous world of her previous masterworks, the Hugo Award–winning Paladin of Souls and Hugo and World Fantasy Award–nominated The Curse of Chalion, with this tale of devotion and strange destiny.

    The half-mad Prince Boleso has been slain by a noblewoman he had intended to defile. It falls to Lord Ingrey kin Wilfcliff to transport the prince to his burial place and to bring the accused killer, Lady Ijada, to judgment. His mission is an ugly and delicate one, for the imminent death of the old Hallow King has placed the crown in play, and the road he travels with his burden and his prisoner is fraught with danger. But in the midst of political chaos, magic has the fiercer hold on Ingrey’s destiny, and Ijada herself may turn out to be the only one he dares trust.

  • Vicki plans to spend her summer vacation waitressing at her father’s seaside restaurant, Ye Olde Seashell Room: a must-see tourist destination with seashell-covered walls and a 230-year-old figurehead from a lost ship, the Storm Goddess. But when the bay mysteriously goes dry and the Storm Goddess suddenly appears, Vicki and her small community are thrown off course. Now the town’s greedy mayor sees dollar signs from potential new tourism, a nosy reporter smells something fishy, and Vicki is haunted by ghosts! Can she, along with her friend, Peter, manage to get aboard the Storm Goddess and unlock its ancient curse?

    Reiche’s masterfully plotted novel blends ghost story, pirate legend, and spine-tingling mystery into one captivating adventure.

  • Celebrated author Jim Harrison, whose robust, tender, and deeply felt books have made their mark on the American literary landscape, here delivers a collection of three novellas infused with all the wisdom and generous spirit that have made him a master writer.

    In the title novella, “The Summer He Didn’t Die,” Brown Dog, a hapless Michigan Indian, is trying to parent his two stepchildren on meager resources; it helps that his charms are irresistible to the new dentist in town.

    “Republican Wives” is a riotous satire on the sexual neuroses of the political right and the irrational nature of love—which, when thwarted, can easily turn into an urge to murder.

    “Tracking” gives the author’s life story as a tale of the places that have marked it.

    With wit as sharp as ever and prose as lush as any Harrison has yet written, The Summer He Didn’t Die is a joyful ode to our journey on this earth.

  • At twelve years old, Amelia Forrest has a lot to pray for: improving her poor grades, mending a strained relationship with her mama, and, most importantly, absolving her guilt over the role she played in her daddy’s plane crash. Except that in the year since he died, Amelia has stopped believing in anything. Not prayer. Not miracles. And certainly not the crackpot visions of an ex-convict named Brother Mustard Seed who suddenly appeared at their door claiming to have contact with her daddy.

    So when Mama invites him to live with them, it stirs up all sorts of trouble—as well as a deep sorrow that Amelia thought she had put to rest.

    By turns sassy and lyrical and wise, Pray Hard is exceptional storytelling from an original new voice.

  • Stuart’s got problems...
    It’s raining. He’s bored.
    And worst of all, he’s new in town.
    So he’s got a lot to worry about.
    But what does a kid like Stuart need in order to have an adventure?

    A cape, of course.

  • This is the story of a gardener named James and his young daughter, Mary. Their simple, joyful life is interrupted when Mary is accused of theft. During the trial, Mary maintains her innocence and tells the truth, in spite of great pressure. But Mary and her father are convicted as thief and accomplice and begin their sentence for the crime. Throughout their sentence, James encourages Mary with lessons from the gospel and continues to prepare her for what is to come. His constant faith is a moral example for his daughter and for the reader.

    Little is known of the origins of this classic religious tale, which was originally written in French, except for the initials of its translator.

  • In a frightening incident, Elsie’s husband, Edward Travilla, narrowly survives an accidental shooting when friends tease son Edward, Jr., into firing a loaded pistol. The shot grazes Edward’s head, and he survives with only minor damage. Soon life in the Travilla household returns to its calm routine. In the meantime, Elsie welcomes a cousin from Scotland who brings a very special talent with him as well as news of her mother’s ancestral family.

    Elsie and Edward take great delight in their burgeoning family. The aftermath of the Civil War provides them with many opportunities to uphold their heritage and faith in practical ways, but they are caught up in a campaign against a powerful adversary—the Ku Klux Klan—as they fight to protect the innocent from unjust persecution.

  • It is time for celebration as Elsie prepares to marry her beloved Edward. Following their wedding, the happy couple honeymoons at Viamede, the childhood home of Elsie’s mother in the bayou region of Louisiana. Here Elsie’s faith matures, and she learns to share her belief with others in a meaningful way.

    Four children—Elsie, Edward, Violet, and Harold—are born to Elsie and Edward, who experience the joys and heartaches of parenthood. Meanwhile, the country teeters on the brink of civil war. Mindful of the tragedies unfolding around her, Elsie is touched by the painful divisions brought on by the War Between the States and the devastating loss of family and friends that accompanies it.

  • As Elsie Dinsmore grows up, her family undergoes major changes. Her father, Horace Dinsmore, falls in love and marries sweet Rose Allison, whom Elsie has loved since childhood. Soon two new members, Horace Jr. and Rosebud, join the happy family.

    Elsie has grown into a graceful, accomplished, and beautiful young woman of fifteen who faces the difficulties of peer pressure, the allurements of the world outside her family, and the delights and confusion of friendships both false and true. She confronts the greatest crisis of her life while visiting her maiden aunt Wealthy, when she experiences first the joy of first love and then the deep pain of betrayal.

    In an attempt to cure her broken heart, Elsie’s family takes her on a tour of Europe. Upon her return, when she least expects it, Elsie discovers the wonder of true love.

  • During a stay at Viamede, the family is blessed with a new addition, Lily, “on loan” from heaven for a short time. Then Elsie takes in Cousin Molly, a young girl who has been injured in a fall. Next, Elsie befriends a nearly blind child of her former governess, and Ronald once again joins the family. As Elsie’s children move from childhood into adulthood, young Elsie’s heart is captured by a fine young man.

  • Eight-year-old Elsie Dinsmore is enjoying a blissful Christmas holiday season with her family when a crisis arises that threatens to change her life as she knows it. Her father has made a request of her that she believes would violate her conscience, and Elsie feels she must refuse him. But he fails to see her refusal as a matter of her deep faith in God, believing that Elsie is merely being willful and disobedient.

    Elsie clings to the promise that her heavenly father will not forsake her as, one by one, everything she holds dear is taken from her. When the turmoil brought on by this conflict brings life-threatening illness for Elsie and a life-changing crisis for her father, Elsie’s faith is tested to the limits.

  • Six-year old Susan helps her grandmother in the kitchen and begins to learn the role of women in the household. It is 1825. Women are not allowed to vote and by law must obey their husbands. Seeing how hard the women of her family work, she is struck by the unfairness of such a law. Susan’s lifelong dedication culminates in the 1920 election wherein women first gain the right to vote. This story gives children a historical sense of how one woman helped to bring about the civil rights that are enjoyed today.

    By focusing on the childhood of famous Americans, this special series of audiobooks allows the subjects to come alive for children. The everyday details of family life, the time period in which they lived, what they wore and the challenges they faced in school create a window through which children can access history. The early evidence of character, responsibility, ability and courage are showcased in common situations to which every child can relate.

    Geared for children ages eight and up, the Childhood of Young Americans series is lively and inspirational. It’s an ideal way to sweep today’s young reader right into the past.

  • Young Clara Barton is shy and lonely in her early days at boarding school. She is snubbed by the other girls because she doesn't know how to talk to them. But when she gets an opportunity to assist the local doctor, her shyness disappears, and Clara begins to discover her true calling as a nurse.

    When her beloved dog, Patch, is run over by a wagon, Clara nurses him back to health. Clara will grow up to become the founder of the American Red Cross and the most famous woman in America!

    Geared for children ages eight and up, the Childhoods of Famous Americans series is lively and inspirational, an ideal way to sweep today's young reader into the era of America's historical heroes.

  • This wonderful collection incorporates the most timeless tales from the best sources of fairy tales: Hans Christian Andersen, Charles Perrault, the Brothers Grimm, and Antoine Galland, translator of The Thousand and One Nights. They are sure to delight audiences of all ages.

    Tales in this collection include Puss in Boots, Rumpelstiltskin, The Frog Prince, Cinderella, or the Glass Slipper, Jack and the Beanstalk, The Wild Swans, Snow White and Rose Red, The Spirit in the Bottle, Little Red Riding Hood, The Three Bears, The Musicians of Bremen, The Fisherman and His Wife, and many others sure to be familiar to children and adults alike.

  • Hannah Whitall Smith wrote The Christian's Secret of a Happy Life in 1875, originally as an article for her husband's magazine. The book subsequently became a worldwide bestseller that has influenced generations of readers.

    In the preface she explains, "This is not a theological book. I frankly confess that I have not been trained in theological schools and do not understand their methods nor their terms. But the Lord has taught me experientially and practically certain lessons out of his Word, which have greatly helped me in my Christian life, and have made it a very happy one. And I want to tell my secret, in the best way I can, in order that some others may be helped into a happy life also."

    This classic devotional offers practical advice and a powerful message. Relating to audiences on a personal level, it invites listeners to live full, blessed lives.

  • There is a pleasure in listening to the imagery of Alexander’s Bridge that is similar to viewing a beautiful watercolor, as in the following description of a Boston street in late afternoon: “The sun sank rapidly; the silvery light had faded from the bare boughs and the watery twilight was setting in when Wilson at last walked down the hill, descending into cooler and cooler depths of grayish shadow.”

    Against this delicate imagery, Willa Cather renders the tough inner terrain of a man in mid-life crisis. Bartley Alexander is a master bridge engineer. At forty-three he is at the height of his power, comfortable with success and all it brings. Yet he yearns for the lost vibrancy of his youth. He leads a double life, veering between his beautiful, accomplished wife and his mistress, an actress he knew as a student in Paris. This conflict creates a crack in the structure of his life which ultimately undermines him.

  • The fifteen stories collected in this volume demonstrate the genius of a woman who, in her own short lifetime, was compared to Chekhov. The tales are sensitive revelations of human behavior in ordinary situations. With careful, quiet observation, Mansfield illuminates complicated relationships and profound, often troubling ideas. Her stories often feature young women in the process of maturity, confronting for the first time some of the realities of life.

    In the title story, a young woman’s garden party coincides with the death of a working-class neighbor, bringing a brush of mortality and realism into her carefully constructed plans and ideals. Her difficulty in fully realizing the seriousness of the event is typical of Mansfield's ironic world.