Narrator

William Dufris

William Dufris
  • In Botswana, people of the north live in harmony with the wildlife, yet predators and poachers roam freely. The lions may be kings, but hyenas will steal their prey. A Chobe Game Park pack led by the alpha female is especially fearless. The locals call her Kotsi Mosadi, Setswana for Danger Woman.

    Following a recent rash of deaths and dismembered body parts appearing in the park, District Superintendent Sanderson is alerted to the discovery of a ravaged human skull, believed to be the work of the Russian Bratva. Fresh from St. Petersburg, led by Oleg Lenka, these mafiosi think it will be a cinch to take over the region’s high-end tourist trade and in particular the casino/hotel operation that is the fiercely held, final dream of American billionaire Leo Painter.

    Sanderson’s friend and, it must be said, her lover, Inspector Kgabo Modise of the Botswana Police Service, is tasked to remove them. Arriving from Gaborone, deploying limited staff undercover, Modise is quickly swept into a complex set of moves orchestrated to outwit not so much Lenka, a traditional kind of thug, but his mistress Irena Davidova, the Bratva’s own Danger Woman. She’s the alpha of the Russian pack―but for how long?

    Aided by Sanderson, who has some clever moves of her own, Modise and his team gradually undermine the Bratva’s assumption that the intimidation tactics that worked in St. Petersburg will work in Botswana, a country where the police are unarmed. And Leo has a ruthless Russian of his own in play, plus resources from Chicago. In parallel, a very pregnant Kotsi Mosadi is fully engaged keeping control of her pack and outwitting relentless lions.

    Within the majestic park, the interplay of predator and prey, the unpredictability of conflicting interests, and the heartlessness of the Bratva culture finally collide to upend an otherwise ordinary night on the Chobe River.

  • When private detective Sam Blackman agrees to help his partner and lover, Nakayla Robertson, conduct a fundraiser for orphaned twins, he does so to ease his conscience. The boys’ parents were killed in a courtroom shootout where Sam was the key witness against the twins’ father. The charity event, a nighttime ghost tour of the legendary haunted sites of Asheville, North Carolina, seems harmless enough. Sam only has to tell the story of a grief-stricken woman who hanged herself from an old, arched stone bridge. “Helen, come forth,” he cries. Sam and his tourgoers expect the actress playing Helen’s ghost to walk toward them from the bridge’s dark recesses. Instead, her body tumbles from overhead and dangles at the end of a noose. Someone has reenacted the legend with deadly authenticity.

    When a second murder mimics another old ghost tale, the police fear a macabre serial killer is on the prowl. But the case isn’t Sam’s to solve. Then, a tidal wave of evidence begins to point to one man—Sam’s friend, defense attorney Hewitt Donaldson. Sam and Nakayla, firmly believing in Donaldson’s innocence, must not only prove it but halt a murderer seemingly bent on retribution. Does the killer’s motivation rise from the present, or is Team Donaldson dealing with some specter from the past?

  • When Cherokee burial remains are unearthed on the site of a local cemetery's expansion, Barry Clayton, part-time deputy and full-time undertaker, finds his dual occupations colliding. Then, during the interment of the wife of one of Gainesboro's most prominent citizens, Cherokee activist Jimmy Panther leads a protest. Words and fists fly.

    When Panther turns up executed on the grave of the deceased woman, Barry is forced to confront her family as the chief suspects. But the case lurches in a new direction with the arrival of Sheriff Tommy Lee Wadkins' army pal, Boston detective Kevin Malone. Malone is on the trail of a Boston hit man who arrived at the Cherokee reservation only days before the murder. Malone is convinced his quarry is the man who pulled the trigger. But who paid him? And why?

    The investigation draws Barry onto the reservation where Jimmy Panther's efforts to preserve Cherokee traditions threatened the development of a new casino, a casino bringing millions of dollars of construction and substantial yearly payouts to every member of the tribe. With the unlikely team of his childhood nemesis Archie Donovan and his elderly Uncle Wayne, Barry goes undercover in an effort to draw out the truth. But the stakes are higher than he realized—and the life of a Cherokee boy becomes the wager. Barry must play his cards very carefully in his riskiest undertaking yet.

  • In spring of 1858, Thompson Grey, a young farmer, travels to his father's estate seeking funds to expand his holdings. Far overstaying his visit, he returns home to find that his absence has contributed to a devastating family tragedy. Haunted by remorse, Thompson abandons his farm and begins a westward exile in the attempt to outpace his grief. Unwittingly, he finds himself at journey's end in the one place where his strongest temptations are able to overtake him and once again put him to the test. Set against the backdrop of the frontier during the years just preceding the Civil War, Crossing Purgatory tells a story of unprincipled ambition, guilt, and the price one man is willing to pay for atonement.

  • Joe Gunther and his team at the Vermont Bureau of Investigation are alerted to a string of unrelated burglaries across Vermont. Someone, in addition to flats creens, computers, and stereos, has also been stealing antiques and jewelry. Meanwhile, in Boston, an elderly woman surprises some thieves in her Beacon Hill home and is viciously murdered. The Boston police find that not only is the loot similar to what's being stolen in Vermont, but it may have the same destination. Word is out that someone powerful is purchasing these particular kinds of items in the "Paradise City" of Northampton, Massachusetts.

    Gunther, the Boston Police, and the vengeful niece of the murdered old lady convene on Northampton, eager to get to the bottom of the mystery and find the "responsible parties"—although each is motivated to mete out some very different penalties.

  • Across Brattleboro, Vermont, rich people (some with dark secrets) are waking up in their high security, alarm-equipped homes to find a Post-It note stuck to their bedside tables reading, "You're it." There is little sign of disturbance anywhere, nothing stolen (that anyone admits) and only a bit of expensive food eaten as a signature. The press loves the story and dubs the burglar the Tag Man. But who is he? And what's he actually doing? In fact, he's quickly running for his life, for what he discovers in one of these houses appears to be proof of a heinous string of murders. But is it?

    Joe Gunther, struggling to recover from a devastating personal loss, leads his VBI team to untangle the many conflicting pieces of evidence, while the burglar himself struggles for survival in the no-man's land between the police and the villains. No one knows what to believe or who to trust. Tag Man is running for his life in a way he never imagined possible. No one knows who's watching as they sleep—or who truly did what.

    Tag Man is critically acclaimed author Archer Mayor at his very finest.

  • A locked-room young adult whodunit in the classic tradition of Sherlock Holmes

    June 1860. A new locomotive christened A Southern Breeze steams across the Carolina countryside carrying seventeen-year-old Jeb Bennett and his twin sister, Rachel Leigh, to the exhilarating promise of a summer in Charleston.

    While storm clouds gather over the landscape, fiercer storms rage inside the passenger cars. The tensions between North and South rapidly escalate until one traveler’s journey abruptly and brutally ends. Who is the murderer? Was the victim the real target? Amid swirling suspicions and deceptive intrigue, Jeb and Rachel Leigh join Pinkerton detective Jonathan Ward in a race to unmask a killer.

    But murder isn’t the only evil Jeb must confront. As motives and suspects abound, Jeb learns what it means to place a price on a human life, not only as a victim of murder but also as property to be traded and sold.

    The final showdown means hard choices, a test of loyalties, and a face-to-face encounter with death on A Southern Breeze.

  • This is the extraordinary story of John Carter, who returns to the Red Planet in search of his beloved, Dejah Thoris. Along with his friend Tars Tarkas, mighty Jeddak of Thark, John lands in the Valley Dor, which is populated by vicious plant men, and discovers the Lost Sea of Korus, guarded by the great white apes and horrifying lions of Barsoom. It is here that he finds the princess Thuvia, who is a captive of the Holy Therns, high priests who eat only the flesh of humans slain by their plant men. But this is only the beginning of John Carter’s adventures under the double moons of Mars before he fights his way back to his own people as the Prince of the House of Tardos Mors.

  • Which president barked likes a dog—and why did another bark like a seal? Who threw lavish dinner parties with twenty-nine courses—and who was so disliked that his parties were boycotted? Which president had eighty pairs of pants? And which liked to remove his pants (and everything else) for a dip in the pool, expecting everyone around him to skinny-dip too? The presidents of the United States have been different not only in politics, but also as people. Kathleen Krull looks at our nation’s fearless leaders with the eye of a gossipy neighbor, dishing the dirt on bad habits, bad fashion, and bad manners (and more than a few good things in between).   
  • VBI (Vermont Bureau of Investigation) head Joe Gunther and his team are called in to investigate a series of violent deaths that appear unrelated until telltale clues reveal a linkage between them and that all of the deaths are, in fact, murders. However, apart from a single drop of unexplained blood left at each crime scene, there are no obvious connections between the victims or the cases. In the search for the elusive truth, the VBI must plumb the depths of every suspect's past, every victim's most intimate details, and examine each piece of evidence down to the smallest detail.

  • Wayne Castine was found brutally murdered and the murderer remains at large. A suspected child predator, he was killed in Brattleboro where he was involved with a tangled network of an extended family living in a local trailer park. Any member of the clan would have had the opportunity to kill him and, as he was involved with both the mother and her twelve-year-old daughter, reason to commit the murder. 

    At the same time, Joe Gunther has learned that his girlfriend Lyn Silva's fisherman father and brother, believed lost at sea off the coast of Maine, might have actually been murdered. Without enough solid information to warrant law enforcement involvement, Lyn returns to Maine to try and investigate Gunther's findings. Gunther periodically puts his ongoing murder investigation on hold—irritating his colleagues and angering his bosses—to go and help Lyn in Maine. It appears increasingly possible that her father and brother weren't the good guys that Lyn always believed them to be and that they might have been involved with vicious smugglers who murdered them—and might do the same to Lyn if she keeps pushing. Torn between his conscience and his heart, a murder investigation and a personal search for the truth, Gunther finds that betrayal and loyalty are often a matter of viewpoint.

  • They are the legal world's oddest couple: a shorts-and-sandals beach bum and a Coral Gables blue blood. The only thing keeping them together is that they're on the same side.

    It starts with a three-hundred-pound marlin stuck in his front door. Even by South Florida standards, where murderers outnumber mosquitoes, this registers as weird. It's not long before Steve Solomon figures out who's making the bizarre death threats. But how can he explain to his partner why an ex-client wants him dead?

    Victoria Lord was used to Steve's cutting legal corners to win, but breaking the law to lose was downright unethical, even for Steve. Now Solomon & Lord is being bashed on local radio and a celebrity shrink with a homicidal me-first philosophy wants to be Steve's new best friend. With a killer on the loose and legal disaster looming, is Steve's lover and law partner about to walk out on him? Is this the end of Solomon & Lord?

    As the squabbling between the Miami lawyers escalates, the killer's real target catches them both off guard.

  • Ex–Confederate Army captain John Carter finds himself suddenly and unwittingly transported to Mars while fleeing Apache Indians. This new world is populated by a race of monstrous Martians whose culture is based on the ability to fight for their race. Captured by the savage green men of Thark, John discovers that the gravitational difference between Mars and Earth has endowed him with the strength that he will need for survival on this hostile planet. He battles ferocious Martian creatures and gains the respect and friendship of the Barsoomians. Along the way he encounters the beautiful Dejah Thoris, Princess of Helium, and earns her everlasting devotion.

  • For six long Martian months, John Carter, Prince of Helium, has haunted the terrifying Temple of the Sun. Inside the walls of this mysterious revolving tower is his beloved wife, Dejah Thoris, the beautiful princess of Barsoom. Worse yet, his wife is trapped there with the lovely but wicked Phaidor, who has sworn to make John Carter her own—even if it means murder. How can Carter gain access to the temple, whose doors swing open only once a year? And when he does find his way inside, will he find Dejah Thoris' welcoming embrace—or her corpse?

    In this continuation of the saga of the amazing world of Barsoom, the love story of Carter and Dejah Thoris—the red-skinned, oviparous princess—unfolds. Like all the tales in the series, fantasy and adventure combine in a style as malleable as dreams, exotic and dangerous and unending.

  • The Thin Man introduces Nick and Nora Charles, New York’s coolest crime-solving couple.

    Nick retired from detecting after his wife inherited a tidy sum, but six years later, a pretty blonde spies him at a speakeasy and asks for his help finding her father, an eccentric inventor who was once Nick’s client.

    Nick can no more resist the case than a morning cocktail or a good fight, and soon he and Nora are caught in a complicated web of confused identities and cold-blooded murder.

  • They are Florida’s most mismatched legal duo: one a glamorous Miami blue blood, the other a Coconut Grove beach bum. And when they get together, you can throw every law right out the window.

    What do you get when you mix beautiful people, family secrets, and a yacht washed up on Sunset Key with a hundred grand in cash and a dying man? Steve Solomon sees a case that can get Solomon & Lord off the ground. But Victoria Lord spies a golden opportunity to go out on her own. With her uncle as a murder suspect and her hunky ex-boyfriend back in the picture, Victoria is pushing to take control as Solomon struggles to keep from losing it. And as an explosive trial looms, they’re fighting against time, the law, and each other to expose a killer—who came to paradise and hasn’t left. 

  • Set in the heady Jazz Age of New York, The Beautiful and Damned chronicles the relationship between Anthony Patch, a Harvard-educated aspiring aesthete, and his beautiful trophy wife, Gloria, as they wait to inherit his grandfather's fortune. Anticipating easy millions, they embrace the glittering, hedonistic lifestyle of the pretentious nouveaux riches but find that they are living a dream that is all too fleeting.

    A devastating satire of reckless ambition and squandered talent, Fitzgerald's novel is also a shattering portrait of a marriage wasted by alcohol and wealth. It depicts an America embarked on the greatest spree in its history, a world Fitzgerald embraced even as he attacked its false social values and shallow literary tastes. Lyrical, romantic, yet cruelly incisive, it signaled a new stage in Fitzgerald's career.

  • Flappers and Philosophers marked F. Scott Fitzgerald’s entry into the realm of the short story, in which he adroitly proved himself “a master of the mechanism of short-story technique” (Boston Transcript). Several of his most well-known tales are represented in this classic collection of eight, including “Bernice Bobs Her Hair” and “Head and Shoulders,” with their particularly O. Henry–like twists; the poignant “Benediction” and “The Cut-Glass Bowl”; and “The Offshore Pirate,” the octet’s opening and “most romantic story” (New York Times Book Review).

    Filtered through Fitzgerald’s remarkable intensity of vision and fed by his matchless imagination, these tales shimmer with the exuberance of youth during the Jazz Age. This sublime short-story collection plumbs the depths of human feeling with a perspicacity that is quintessential Fitzgerald.

  • On June 3, 1863, nineteen-year-old Confederate lieutenant John Dooley prepared to march on Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Thomas Galway, a seventeen-year-old corporal in the Union army, waited for the battle to begin.

    Drawing on the written accounts of these young soldiers, Murphy traces the circumstances leading to the dramatic battle of Gettysburg and Lincoln’s historic address at the dedication of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg.