The Age of Innocence

Edith Wharton

Lorna Raver (Narrator)

11-20-07

11hrs 46min

Abridgement

Unabridged

Genre

Fiction/Classics

As low as $0.00
Play Audio Sample

11-20-07

11hrs 46min

Abridgement

Unabridged

Genre

Fiction/Classics

Description

“ Lorna Raver manages to present distinctive and perfectly modulated voices for over a dozen characters…Raver is not yet a household name in audiobooks, but she should be. Winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award.” AudioFile

Winner of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
Winner of an AudioFile Earphones Award
An O Magazine Pick of 25 Books Every Woman Should Read
A Town & Country Magazine Pick
An Electric Literature Pick of Books about the Burden of Female Beauty Standards

Winner of the first Pulitzer Prize for literature ever awarded to a woman, The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton’s elegant portrait of desire and betrayal in old New York.

In the highest circle of New York social life during the 1870s, Newland Archer, a young lawyer, prepares to marry the docile May Welland. But before their engagement is announced, he meets the mysterious, nonconformist Countess Ellen Olenska, May’s cousin, who has returned to New York after a long absence. Ellen mirrors his own sense of disillusionment with society and the
“good marriage” he is about to embark upon and provokes a moral struggle within him as he continues to go through the motions.

A social commentary of surprising compassion and insight, The Age of Innocence toes the line between the comedy of manners and the tragedy of thwarted love.

Praise

“ Lorna Raver manages to present distinctive and perfectly modulated voices for over a dozen characters…Raver is not yet a household name in audiobooks, but she should be. Winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award.” AudioFile

“In some ways, Edith Wharton’s classic novel feels more current than ever.” New York Times

“Wharton’s characters leap out from the pages and…become very real. You know their hearts, souls, and yearnings and the price they pay for those yearnings.” San Francisco Examiner

Details
More Information
Language English
Release Day Nov 19, 2007
Release Date November 20, 2007
Release Date Machine 1195516800
Imprint Blackstone Publishing
Provider Craig Black
Categories Pulitzers Prize Winners, Literature & Fiction, Women's Fiction, Classics, Historical Fiction, Classics, Evergreen Classics, Evergreen Classics, Classics, Fiction - All, Fiction - Adult
Author Bio
Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton (1862–1937) is the author the novels The Age of Innocence and Old New York , both of which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. She was the first woman to receive that honor. In 1929 she was awarded the American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Fiction. She was born in New York and is best known for her stories of life among the upper-class society into which she was born. She was educated privately at home and in Europe. In 1894 she began writing fiction, and her novel The House of Mirth established her as a leading writer.

Narrator Bio
Lorna Raver

Lorna Raver, named one of AudioFile magazine’s Best Voices of the Year, has received numerous Audie Award nominations and many AudioFile Earphones Awards. She has appeared on stage in New York, Los Angeles, and regional theaters around the country. Among her many television credits are NYPD Blue, Judging Amy, Boston Legal, ER, and Star Trek. She starred in director Sam Raimi’s film Drag Me to Hell.

Overview

Winner of the 1921 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
Winner of an AudioFile Earphones Award
An O Magazine Pick of 25 Books Every Woman Should Read
A Town & Country Magazine Pick
An Electric Literature Pick of Books about the Burden of Female Beauty Standards

Winner of the first Pulitzer Prize for literature ever awarded to a woman, The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton’s elegant portrait of desire and betrayal in old New York.

In the highest circle of New York social life during the 1870s, Newland Archer, a young lawyer, prepares to marry the docile May Welland. But before their engagement is announced, he meets the mysterious, nonconformist Countess Ellen Olenska, May’s cousin, who has returned to New York after a long absence. Ellen mirrors his own sense of disillusionment with society and the
“good marriage” he is about to embark upon and provokes a moral struggle within him as he continues to go through the motions.

A social commentary of surprising compassion and insight, The Age of Innocence toes the line between the comedy of manners and the tragedy of thwarted love.

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