The Soul of the Indian and Seven Native American Tales

Charles Alexander Eastman

Scott Peterson (Narrator)

01-01-03

2hrs 18min

Abridgement

Unabridged

Genre

Nonfiction/Social Science

As low as $0.00
Play Audio Sample

01-01-03

2hrs 18min

Abridgement

Unabridged

Genre

Nonfiction/Social Science

Description

Charles Alexander Eastman, an educated and well-known Sioux, saw both sides of the great divide between Indians and whites, and he wrote eleven books attempting to reconcile the two cultures. Although he was a convert to Christianity, Eastman never lost his sense of the wholeness and beauty of the Indian's relation to his existence and to the natural world.

These six essays on the Indian's spiritual beliefs and cultural habits, told in very personal terms and coupled with seven folk tales, illuminate the high ethics and morality of a culture that few people know about.

The six essays are: "The Great Mystery," "The Family Altar," "Ceremonial and Symbolic Worship," "Barbarism and the Moral Code," "The Unwritten Scriptures," and "On the Borderland of Spirits."

The seven Native American tales are: "The Buffalo and the Field Mouse," "The Frogs and the Crane," "The Falcon and the Duck," "The Raccoon and the Bee Tree," "The Comrades," "The Runaways," and "The Magic Arrows."

Details
More Information
Language English
Release Day Dec 31, 2002
Release Date January 1, 2003
Release Date Machine 1041379200
Imprint Blackstone Publishing
Provider Blackstone Publishing
Categories Politics & Social Sciences, Social Sciences
Author Bio
Charles Alexander Eastman

Charles Alexander Eastman (1858–1939) was born on the Santee Reservation in Minnesota. His grandparents raised him after his mother’s death and his father’s capture during the Minnesota Sioux uprising. At the age of fifteen, he was reunited with his father and embarked on a life in white man’s society. He became a doctor and spent the rest of his life helping Indian people cope with the changes to their world and trying to reconcile the opposing values and beliefs of white society and Sioux culture.

Narrator Bio

Overview

Charles Alexander Eastman, an educated and well-known Sioux, saw both sides of the great divide between Indians and whites, and he wrote eleven books attempting to reconcile the two cultures. Although he was a convert to Christianity, Eastman never lost his sense of the wholeness and beauty of the Indian's relation to his existence and to the natural world.

These six essays on the Indian's spiritual beliefs and cultural habits, told in very personal terms and coupled with seven folk tales, illuminate the high ethics and morality of a culture that few people know about.

The six essays are: "The Great Mystery," "The Family Altar," "Ceremonial and Symbolic Worship," "Barbarism and the Moral Code," "The Unwritten Scriptures," and "On the Borderland of Spirits."

The seven Native American tales are: "The Buffalo and the Field Mouse," "The Frogs and the Crane," "The Falcon and the Duck," "The Raccoon and the Bee Tree," "The Comrades," "The Runaways," and "The Magic Arrows."

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